Trails for everyone, forever

Home Go Outside Hiking Guide

Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

3944 Hikes

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
3.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 600 ft.
Highest Point: 1780 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
Whether you’re in the area or just driving through, Diablo Lake is always a good spot to stop and take in the North Cascades. If you want to extend your stop into a hike, check out the Sourdough Creek Trail. This short and moderate trail traverses through lush, mossy forest and leads you up to the Sourdough Creek waterfalls. With wildlife, mountain and lake views and plenty of rest stops, this trail is perfect for all ages.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
9.9 miles, one-way
Gain: 4500 ft.
Highest Point: 5965 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Ridges/passes
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Summits
  • Lakes
Pierce Mountain Trail is a gentle trail up Sourdough Mountain from the Big Beaver trail.
 
 

Central Cascades > Entiat Mountains/Lake Chelan

 
1.6 miles, roundtrip
Highest Point: 1200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Good for kids
  • Rivers
Take a walk around the historic (and still operational) apple orchard in the Stehekin valley.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
1.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 0 ft.
Highest Point: 480 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Established campsites
The short hike follows the river around the Newhaken Creek Campground on a mostly level trail. The signs along the way denote the common trees and plants of the lush understory and tall trees surrounding the trail.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
Highest Point: 8815 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
Forbidden Peak is one of Washington's 100 steepest peaks. The route to Forbidden Peak is a Class 5 and involves exposed climbing. Gear and experience recommended.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
Highest Point: 8334 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(1 vote)
  • Mountain views
  • Summits
The route to Austera Peak involves exposed climbing and glacier travel. Gear and experience recommended.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
19.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 7300 ft.
Highest Point: 8508 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Summits
The route to Primus Peak involves exposed climbing and glacier travel. Gear and experience recommended.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
Highest Point: 5639 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Summits
The route to Damnation Peak is a Class 3 and involved exposed scrambling. Gear and experience are recommended.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
14.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 5032 ft.
Highest Point: 6000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Summits
  • Lakes
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
A climb in the North Cascades. Climbing gear, routefinding experience and expertise required.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
3.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 635 ft.
Highest Point: 1875 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.86
(35 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Established campsites
Hike this easy leg stretcher while taking in the beautiful scenery of the North Cascades Highway. A good stop if you have a car full of restless children or you are showing off the area to visiting relatives. The views from the top are a big payoff for such a short hike.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
9.7 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3789 ft.
Highest Point: 5832 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.40
(30 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Summits
  • Lakes
Incredible views and beautiful alpine lakes are your reward if you can ascend this steep trail in the North Cascades. At the top, you can choose between taking in sweeping panoramic views of North Cascades National Park and the Pickets Range, or relaxing near the lowest of the Thornton Lakes, both of which make a rewarding destination.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
12.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1300 ft.
Highest Point: 1900 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.68
(22 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
A pale green creek, big old trees, a variety of understory, and peek-a-boo views of snow-capped peaks. Day-hikers should take it easy, as the joy here is in the journey not the destination. Backpackers, however, may disagree. Families and first-time backpackers will enjoy beautiful camps just two miles from the trailhead. Experienced backpackers will note that Thunder Creek is a gateway to an extensive network of trails.
 
 

Central Cascades > Entiat Mountains/Lake Chelan

 
7.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 100 ft.
Highest Point: 1200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(4 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
If you’re overnighting in the Stehekin Valley and just want a riverside ramble to while away the hours, try the Stehekin River Trail. It’s an easy forested walk along the mighty Stehekin River on a side of the valley that few visitors get to see.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
6.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1100 ft.
Highest Point: 2136 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.67
(6 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Rivers
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Waterfalls
The Stettatle Creek Trail is an infrequently-used path that delivers hikers into a deep canyon in the heart of the North Cascades. Though it clears early in the season, this may not be the best option for those looking for an easy walk -- the trail is rugged and requires scrambling in places.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
10.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4870 ft.
Highest Point: 5985 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.95
(21 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Summits
The mountainous views that once inspired beatnik poets continue to inspire modern-day hikers who take on this strenuous yet rewarding challenge.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
11.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2000 ft.
Highest Point: 3500 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.40
(5 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
Panther Creek is a small gem in a setting of big gems. The North Cascades boasts some of the biggest, finest views in the country, and quiet, contemplative hikes like Panther Creek can get lost in the mix. Nevertheless, it’s well worth hikers’ time to venture into these forests and meadows to ascend Fourth of July Pass.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Bellingham Area

 
2.4 miles of trails
Gain: 20 ft.
Highest Point: 111 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
Berthusen Park offers up plenty of great opportunities to get outdoors and explore. This beautiful park, the site of a homestead from the late 1800s, has antique farm machinery, a historical cabin, a big red barn and a great playground with a wonderful swing set for kids.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
8.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2500 ft.
Highest Point: 5540 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.57
(21 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Mountain views
  • Summits
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

Scorpion Mountain offers a 360-degree view of the Central Cascades, and the huckleberries and blueberries make this a much underrated fall hike.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
8.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1500 ft.
Highest Point: 4000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.40
(5 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Rivers

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

Hike through shady forest, accompanied by the sound of Quartz Creek, little waterfalls, wildflowers and interesting things to see (and eat) on this trail.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1000 ft.
Highest Point: 3250 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.40
(5 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Rivers
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Waterfalls

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

Pass Creek is an easy access point to the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) and provides opportunities for longer loop hikes open to stock when conditions permit.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
10.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1000 ft.
Highest Point: 4000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.86
(7 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Established campsites
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Summits
  • Rivers

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

This hike is a tree hugger's paradise. Huge old growth Douglas firs and hemlocks soar into the sky from a lush green forest floor dotted with woodland flowers. The trail gently ascends only 700 feet in the first four miles, and the slope you hike up is laced by many clear flowing streams bridged by old puncheons.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3500 ft.
Highest Point: 6129 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.50
(10 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Summits
  • Wildlife

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

A fairly well used climber's trail goes straight up, and up, and then up Mount Baring. The trail requires moderate navigational skills and possibly climbing equipment in bad weather.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
Rating:
Average rating:
4.08
(12 votes)

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

This unofficial trail is short, steep and extremely eroded. Because it's not officially built or managed hikers are encouraged to find other locations to explore in the area.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
2.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1425 ft.
Highest Point: 5587 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.95
(22 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Good for kids

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

A short but stiff climb through an old burn, old growth forest, and alpine meadows to a restored fire lookout standing sentinel over the western flanks of the Wild Sky Wilderness.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
5.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 712 ft.
Highest Point: 3888 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.18
(11 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

Eagle Lake is a shallow and infrequently visited alpine lake in the shadows of Merchant Peak and Townsend Mountain in the Stevens Pass region. Walk this trail to experience a variety of mountain terrain and wildlife encompassed by few other hikes.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
7.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3300 ft.
Highest Point: 4600 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.44
(148 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Summits
  • Lakes

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

Visit one of the most striking lakes in the Henry M. Jackson wilderness. The vibrant blue of the glacier-fed lake provides the perfect rest stop for hikers who have braved the thirty-odd, steep switchbacks that lead to the lake.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
14.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3700 ft.
Highest Point: 5816 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.50
(8 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

Climb through rich, old growth forest to miles of some of the finest ridge walking available in Washington, where alpine meadows and jaw-dropping views abound.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
4.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 500 ft.
Highest Point: 2423 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.96
(85 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

Barclay Lake offers something for almost everyone: a well-maintained trail that is accessible to beginners and children, stunning mountain views, mycology, camping, a serene alpine lake, and a staging area for challenging adventures in the 106,000-acre Wild Sky Wilderness. Keep your camera charged, as this popular pathway in the shadow of Baring Mountain offers many photo opportunities.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
Gain: 2300 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.50
(2 votes)
  • Summits

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

The Frog Mountain Trail is still in the construction phase, and when complete, will be a roughly four-mile path to the mountain's summit.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
1.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 104 ft.
Highest Point: 1420 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.67
(3 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Rivers

The trail is currently inaccessible due to the Bolt Creek Fire.

A short but scenic nature trail that begins and ends at the Troublesome Creek Campground. Hikers and campers will enjoy the walk along and over the turquoise creek, which indeed could be troublesome without the bridges spanning the shores.