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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

3975 Hikes

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
8.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3300 ft.
Highest Point: 5353 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.78
(23 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Summits
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
Bare Mountain, the site of a former fire lookout, is a superb viewpoint with mountains in every direction and lakes close by. In season, appreciate the great variety of wildflowers, beginning at the trailhead and continuing all the way to the summit. And be alert for birds and wild critters. They are out there.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
5.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 300 ft.
Highest Point: 900 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.86
(14 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
Take a mellow walk on a trail that wanders among large old trees and huge mossy boulders. The trail alongside Baker River takes you on a path of gentle up and downs, splashing your way through stream crossings and past open areas filled with young alder, huckleberry and salmonberry. On a quiet spring day, your chances of seeing wildlife are excellent.
 
 

Southwest Washington > Columbia River Gorge - WA

 
15.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4400 ft.
Highest Point: 3000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.75
(4 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Rivers
The Augspurger Mountain Trail offers a great loop option to the popular Dog Mountain Trail. The two trails share the same trailhead, but the Augspurger trail heads off to the west. The way is more gentle, and a 1.5 mile connector trail links the two together. Along the way, enjoy bouncy balsamroot blooms in May and fantastic views of the Columbia River Gorge, Mount Hood and more all year round.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
9.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 500 ft.
Highest Point: 1000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.71
(21 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
This hike along Baker Lake is a busy, popular trail in summer. It is a nice off season walk though, and is perfect on a crisp, clear winter day. With the leaves off the trees, views that aren't possible in summer emerge; the surrounding peaks and the mossy green silhouettes of the leafless maple trees cover the hillside. A bonus any time of year are the many creeks, quaint bridges, large old-growth trees and of course, Mount Baker as the main attraction.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Selkirk Range

 
11.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 400 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.71
(7 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Established campsites
Hug the shoreline for a lovely out-and-back trek along the undeveloped side of Bead Lake.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
4.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 500 ft.
Highest Point: 2423 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.97
(86 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers

Wildfire: trail closed

Barclay Lake offers something for almost everyone: a well-maintained trail that is accessible to beginners and children, stunning mountain views, mycology, camping, a serene alpine lake, and a staging area for challenging adventures in the 106,000-acre Wild Sky Wilderness. Keep your camera charged, as this popular pathway in the shadow of Baring Mountain offers many photo opportunities.
 
 

North Cascades > Pasayten

 
31.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4000 ft.
Highest Point: 6700 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(4 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Summits
  • Ridges/passes
Dive deep into the heart of the Pasayten Wilderness on the Andrews Creek trail. Walk along Andrews Creek through a burn zone. Connect to the Boundary trail after passing through a lush meadow of wildflowers.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Spokane Area/Coeur d'Alene

 
15.0 miles of trails
Highest Point: 3366 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
5.00
(1 vote)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Summits
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
Acquired in four phases through Spokane County’s Conservation Futures Program, with additional funding secured through the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office, the Antoine Peak Conservation Area offers fantastic views overlooking Liberty Lake, the Spokane Valley, and north to Mount Spokane and the Selkirk Range.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
6.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1100 ft.
Highest Point: 4900 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.36
(22 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
This trail features plenty of variety, with destinations spaced perfectly for families or first-time backpackers. Beautiful hemlock forest, meadows dotted with wildflowers, gleaming lakes, mountain views, juicy berries and excellent camping are all available. Wait until later in the hiking season though, as this area is known for its bugs.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Whidbey Island

 
2.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 175 ft.
Highest Point: 450 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(1 vote)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
Enjoy a nearly-level forest walk with close-up views of beaver dams and likely sightings of water fowl including (in season) trumpeter swans, plus kingfishers, woodpeckers, and owls.
 
 

South Cascades > Goat Rocks

 
9.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1200 ft.
Highest Point: 4800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(1 vote)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Lakes
  • Rivers

The trail is currently closed from the trailhead to the Clear Lost Trail due to the Goat Rocks Fire

Many hikers only see the first couple miles of this trail, since Lily Lake is a popular location for families. But the Clear Fork Trail is many miles long, and offers fantastic adventure past the small lake.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Spokane Area/Coeur d'Alene

 
3.46 miles of trails
Gain: 670 ft.
Highest Point: 2920 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(1 vote)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
Antoine Peak's Canfield Gulch is the east side access to this 1,296 acre conservation area.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
3.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 450 ft.
Highest Point: 525 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.23
(13 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
Bridle Trails State Park offers more than 28 miles of pleasant, forested trails conveniently located between Bellevue and Kirkland. This park is popular with horseback riders, so while dogs are allowed, they must be kept on leash to avoid startling horses.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1400 ft.
Highest Point: 5100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
5.00
(2 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Ridges/passes
The route up Tonga Ridge is not clearly marked for winter travel. Visitors to this area should have a route planned, a map, snow travel and avalanche travel skills.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
0.6 miles, one-way
Gain: 480 ft.
Highest Point: 3646 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Established campsites
This short connector trail goes to Deception and Fisher creeks, which lead to Deception Lakes, the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), and Deception Pass. The trailhead also provides alternative access to other area highlights such as Tonga Ridge and Fisher Lake.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
9.85 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2630 ft.
Highest Point: 5090 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.20
(5 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Lakes
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
This group of small lakes in the Alpine Wilderness sits along the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) between Mac Peak and Surprise Mountain. It's a great rest stop for a multi-day backpacking trip along the PCT, a campsite for an overnight trip, or even a destination for a long day hike.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
0.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 0 ft.
Highest Point: 39 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
Families will enjoy this small community park in the city of Woodinville. Take a walk in the woods along a half-mile boardwalk loop trail or blow off some steam on the playground pr climbing boulder.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
5.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 800 ft.
Highest Point: 930 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
5.00
(1 vote)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
There is one section of the Lake Wynoochee Lakeshore Trail that can be hiked year-round—a pleasant, interesting hike for all ages, at 6 miles round-trip and 800 feet of elevation gain. Its creeks have bridges; it has road access at both ends; it features flowers in spring and summer, autumn color in fall, and provides a pleasant winter outing in clear weather.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Olympia

 
2.0 miles of trails
Gain: 75 ft.
Highest Point: 40 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.50
(2 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Coast
Bayshore Preserve is a 74-acre spread of land on the Bayshore Peninsula which pokes into Oakland Bay. A former golf course, WTA is working on improving the informal trails here so hikers can enjoy an area that is undergoing restoration efforts.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
8.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 578 ft.
Highest Point: 306 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.75
(4 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
This West Seattle urban hike features a peat bog, public art, a salmon stream that runs through front yards, and a shopping center parking lot.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Salmon La Sac/Teanaway

 
7.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2900 ft.
Highest Point: 5034 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.67
(12 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Summits
  • Ridges/passes

Parking is extremely limited at this location. Please read the driving directions below for more information.

Hex Mountain is now located partially on private property please and is inaccessible to vehicles.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Kitsap Peninsula

 
4.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 50 ft.
Highest Point: 430 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(3 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
Banner Forest Heritage Park is one square mile of undeveloped forest and wetland on the Kitsap Peninsula with an extensive trail network. An easy grade and well maintained trails invite all ages and abilities to enjoy this prime section of land.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - East

 
12.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2100 ft.
Highest Point: 4800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.60
(5 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
The Chiwawa River Trail offers hikers the rugged scenery that's the signature of the Glacier Peak Wilderness but for less effort than other hikes nearby. Try this trail to enjoy solitude while basking in sublime mountain scenery.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
3.25 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 767 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.00
(1 vote)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
The Ravensdale Retreat Natural Area is a 145-acre park in historic Ravensdale, south of the Issaquah Alps. The natural area borders Rock Creek to the south, below Ravensdale Ridge. It's primarily intended for foot traffic, but you may see an occasional equestrian rider. Mountain bikes are discouraged but not disallowed; the nearby Black Diamond Natural Area has trails that are specifically designed with proper tread and pitch on turns for bikes. While there are several trails across the natural area, this entry describes a lollipop loop to catch the highlights.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
2.0 miles of trails
Gain: 110 ft.
Highest Point: 400 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
Robinswood Community Park has a 10-acre wooded area with about 2 miles of hiking trails. The rest of the park includes a small pond, big grassy fields, dog parks, and sports fields. The park is also home to the Robinswood House. It's easily accessible from the surrounding neighborhoods, which includes Bellevue College.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
0.9 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 100 ft.
Highest Point: 330 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
This simple trail next door provides a brief getaway into nature in the busy Factoria area. The Sunset Ravine trail is a short out-and-back path along the edge of a ravine through a greenbelt. It's easily accessible from the neighborhoods near Tyee Community Gym and Middle School. The other end of the trail is about two tenths of a mile from T-Mobile headquarters.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
4.1 miles of trails
Gain: 154 ft.
Highest Point: 376 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.25
(4 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
Bird watching, historical sites and Rainer and Olympic views.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
10.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4073 ft.
Highest Point: 5162 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.13
(45 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Summits
Along with the numerous other I-90 hikes there is no shortage of ‘workout’ on this hike. Like its counterparts, this trail is largely for those interested in heading up, steeply. Moderated with switchbacks at times, and with a gradual traverse when you need it, the rewards here are not without effort. The actual summit is a rock-scramble, but the views and the flower-packed west facing slope near the top can be enjoyed without making the true top. More than a few remaining old-growth trees and a soft tread make this a well-rounded hike whether it is a training hike or your weekend reward.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
6.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1220 ft.
Highest Point: 3780 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.94
(126 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
With a moderate grade on a wide trail, the hike to Talapus Lake is the perfect introduction to the outdoors for hikers and beginning backpackers. Upon arrival at Talapus, break out lunch or pitch camp. Either way, you can cool off in the large lake. If you feel like pressing on, Ollalie Lake is just about a mile and a half up trail, where open campsites offer lakeside havens with calm waters and views of a beautiful lake basin.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
13.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3800 ft.
Highest Point: 4585 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.94
(35 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Mountain views
  • Summits
  • Waterfalls
Mountains to Sound Greenway did this road to trail conversion in order to create a more sustainable, safer route for hikers to a summit on the I-90 corridor. Hike through second- and third-growth forest, pass a lovely waterfall, and enjoy a slightly less-crowded trail than the nearby Mount Si.