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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

3944 Hikes

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
9.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2000 ft.
Highest Point: 5300 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.45
(11 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Wildlife
  • Lakes
The Alpine Lakes Wilderness may be reached from numerous trail heads along the I-90 corridor. This little trail-gem sparkles, hidden in Snoqualmie Pass. It varies in terrain from abandoned logging road, through clear cut, all the way up to pristine alpine lake(s) nestled into a glacier scoured cirque. Seasonal changes make this medium difficulty hike worth returning to time and time again.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
3.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 800 ft.
Highest Point: 240 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.88
(16 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Coast
Explore forest trails along Piper's Creek and adjoining ridges. Visit a Puget Sound beach and enjoy great views across the Sound to the Olympics. In the fall, observe migrating salmon in the creek.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Cougar Mountain

 
4.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1340 ft.
Highest Point: 1430 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.57
(7 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Ridges/passes
This is the most direct entry to Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park from Seattle, Issaquah and Bellevue. WTA has done lots of work on Cougar Mountain since 2009, but signage may not be entirely up-to-date.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
2.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 10 ft.
Highest Point: 3000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.76
(25 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
The flat terrain of this wide valley east of Snoqualmie Pass is the perfect place to practice snowshoeing with kids or first-timers. This is an area popular with cross-country skiers, and you may spot beaver dams and other winter wildlife. From Mardee Lake to looming Kendall Peak before you, this is premiere terrain for winter enthusiasts.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Salmon La Sac/Teanaway

 
13.7 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4223 ft.
Highest Point: 7223 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.56
(25 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Summits
  • Ridges/passes
From Navaho Pass, the trail to Navaho Peak is siren-like, pulling you towards the summit long after you realize how tired you are. But for peak-baggers, or those simply interested in getting a gorgeous view from a relatively easy-to-navigate peak, the views are worth the extra effort.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
3.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1000 ft.
Highest Point: 4800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.25
(4 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
A short, beautiful, but very steep unofficial bootpath to Lake Laura and Lake Lillian, this route gets you there in a quarter of the time, but breathing just as hard.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - East

 
24.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 5000 ft.
Highest Point: 6200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(9 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Lakes
  • Established campsites
  • Ridges/passes
A steep and rough-at-times trail leads hikers into some of the loneliest, yet most stunning, lake basins within the Alpine Lakes Wilderness.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - East

 
10.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1800 ft.
Highest Point: 5150 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.86
(14 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Lakes
Josephine is a beautiful lake 5.2 miles south of Stevens Pass on the Pacific Crest Trail. The trail winds thru the Stevens Pass Ski area, climbing for two miles to top of the hill, gaining 1000 feet along the way.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1600 ft.
Highest Point: 4600 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.04
(80 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Lakes
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Fall foliage
From Rachel Lake you can access further adventures at Rampart Lakes, Lila Lakes and Alta Peak. This hike is a popular weekend overnight destination; so don’t expect to be by yourself in high season.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
11.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2200 ft.
Highest Point: 5100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.11
(27 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Established campsites
  • Mountain views
  • Waterfalls
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
Rampart Lakes is a pretty collection of pothole lakes with a maze of social trails lacing them together. Though doable as a day hike, it is better enjoyed as an overnight destination, with nearby Alta Mountain and Lila Lake making excellent side trips.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Tiger Mountain

 
7.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1748 ft.
Highest Point: 2021 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.84
(124 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
Hike railroad grades dating from the logging era. Cross many small creeks, some seasonal. Pass tall trees draped with moss. Enjoy ferns and, in season, forest wildflowers and wild berries. Reach a viewpoint that's also a favorite launching spot for paragliders.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Bellingham Area

 
7.15 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1400 ft.
Highest Point: 2120 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.92
(12 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Lakes
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
This is a loop made up of several well signed trails on Blanchard Mountain in the Chuckanuts. The trail offers that other-world ancientness with its dark forests, moss and house-sized boulders. It makes a good year-round hike, with a route that passes by waterfalls, swamps, two lakes, wildlife activity, old growth and evidence of logging operations from the nineteenth century.
 
 

North Cascades > Mountain Loop Highway

 
10.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1400 ft.
Highest Point: 3161 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.23
(125 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
A nice hike with plenty of variety. Beautiful forest, a rushing creek, waterfalls of all shapes and sizes, history, and of course a large blue-green lake surrounded by snowy peaks. At 10.4 miles, it can be either a day-hike or a quick early season overnight. You won’t be alone, though – this is a popular trail with both hikers and backpackers.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Tiger Mountain

 
3.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2022 ft.
Highest Point: 2522 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.68
(25 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
What a workout! The Cable Line Trail on Tiger Mountain is not for the weak of heart, nor the weak of knees. A steep, slippery incline awaits you here, up to the summit of West Tiger 3.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Tiger Mountain

 
5.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2100 ft.
Highest Point: 2525 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.32
(44 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Wildlife
This close-to-the-city wild land trail provides stunning views, great forestlands and ample opportunities to see birds and critters. Of the three peaks on West Tiger, this peak offers the best views, despite being the lowest of the triplets.
 
 

Central Washington > Yakima

 
6.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2400 ft.
Highest Point: 3480 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.88
(17 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Ridges/passes
  • Summits
  • Dogs allowed on leash
Get a workout on this steep hike from Umtanum Creek to the ridge above the canyon. In spring, it is filled with wildflowers and birds, with chances of seeing rattlesnakes and bighorn sheep.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
3.7 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1300 ft.
Highest Point: 1550 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.63
(182 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
Companion piece to neighbor and big brother Mount Si, the small rocky bluff known as Little Si is a moderate grade 3.7 mile trail located in the hike rich North Bend area. Although relatively steep inclines bookend this hike, this primarily North/South route is perfect for beginners who are looking to get back in shape, while still accommodating veterans with opportunities to cut away on the Boulder Garden Loop (at .3 miles and .5 miles) to merge with the more challenging Mount Si trail. Expect crowds, even in winter, as New Year’s resolutions (the two Si mountains are sometimes colloquially referred to as the “Resolution Peaks” for the deluge of hikers that appear after January 1st), proximity to the city and a degree of refuge from the elements often divert heavy foot traffic to this mini-mountain to keep it busy year round.
 
 

North Cascades > Mountain Loop Highway

 
5.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1200 ft.
Highest Point: 2440 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.55
(11 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Lakes
A great day hike in summer, the route to Lake 22 can be avalanche prone in winter. It's best to wait until the snow is melted on this popular Mountain Loop Highway trail.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Salmon La Sac/Teanaway

 
11.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3000 ft.
Highest Point: 6000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.07
(45 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Ridges/passes
  • Dogs allowed on leash
Navaho Pass is an excellent introduction to the Teanaway area. Rife with wildflowers, fascinating geology, and just enough elevation gain to keep it interesting, this hike has just about everything that the Teanaway is known for.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
1.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 10 ft.
Highest Point: 3000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.36
(25 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
Gold Creek Pond is an ADA-accessible paved loop hike around a picturesque mountain pond atop Snoqualmie Pass.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
7.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1800 ft.
Highest Point: 3600 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.84
(199 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Lakes
  • Rivers

7/12/2022 - This trail is closed until October 2022

Waterfalls, wildflowers, sheltering forests, mountain views and an alpine lake are offered on this well-maintained trail. At the lake, enjoy the sights and relax for a while. If you backpacked in, stay at the campsites for a sunrise and sunset on the lake.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Cougar Mountain

 
4.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 489 ft.
Highest Point: 1122 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.91
(23 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
A moderate, year round loop trail in the Issaquah Alps that is popular with hikers, dog walkers and trail runners. Entering the large parking area at the Red Town trailhead (one of several in this 3,100-acre regional park) it’s hard to imagine that what is today a lush green forest was once a busy coalmine operation. Now all that remains are nearly forgotten place names, a few carefully preserved artifacts and caution signs warning of the hazards of travel off established trails.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Cougar Mountain

 
4.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1200 ft.
Highest Point: 1598 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.14
(35 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Summits
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
Hike trails named in honor of mountaineers Jim Whittaker and Nawang Gombu, of 1963 Mount Everest ascent fame. Wilderness Peak may not be Everest, but it is the highest point in King County's Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park and it does have some wonderful old-growth conifers. This loop offers a diversity of steep forested hillsides, huge mossy boulders, and a low swampy area traversed via a narrow boardwalk.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
2.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 500 ft.
Highest Point: 1000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.14
(216 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Rivers
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Waterfalls
Visit a trio (yes, trio) of waterfalls just off I-90 on this sure-to-please short trail, perfect for families.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Tiger Mountain

 
3.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1760 ft.
Highest Point: 1850 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.07
(82 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Summits
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
Hike a short but steep trail with many stone steps. Pause at a viewpoint offering a fine view of Mount Rainier, then continue on to Poo Poo Point itself, only 1.9 miles from the trailhead. Enjoy views to the northwest, and perhaps watch paragliders sailing off into the sky.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3010 ft.
Highest Point: 6260 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.34
(62 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Summits
  • Fall foliage
Mount Townsend offers rhododendrons in May and June, wildflowers June through August, then berries in August and September and fall colors in, well, fall. Add in old growth, some tucked away waterfalls, and a windswept, turtleback summit with views north across the Strait and San Juans, west and south into and along the Olympics and east across the Sound to the Cascades, and you've got the perfect year-round hike.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
6.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 700 ft.
Highest Point: 2800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.02
(44 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Rivers
  • Waterfalls
Take a hike through railroad history. The old tunnels, rusting relics, cement snow sheds and the big red caboose should appeal to kids of all ages, and the complex history of the railroad and those who built it, as well as the avalanche that wiped everything away will appeal to history buffs.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
10.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2200 ft.
Highest Point: 4857 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.35
(37 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
Gem Lake is nestled at the foot of Wright Mountain and is about two miles beyond the trail junction at Rock Creek trail #1013.1 that intersects with the Snow Lake trail starting at Alpental. Beautiful colors surround the lake in autumn as do the many climbable peaks in the area.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
4.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1600 ft.
Highest Point: 2600 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.63
(65 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
Get a workout and experience rock work completed by Department of Natural Resources and WTA volunteer crews on this hike. Your reward is a rocky overlook from which you can marvel at Mount Kent, McClellan Butte, and Mount Washington, the behemoths forming the south rim of the west entrance to Snoqualmie Pass.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3400 ft.
Highest Point: 5240 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.23
(116 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Mountain views
  • Summits
  • Waterfalls
There are two sides to Bandera Mountain – gentle and well groomed on the one hand, rough and untamed on the other. Together, they make for a very satisfying hike along a rocky ridge to a false summit (Little Bandera) with views impressive enough to dissuade most from completing the final half mile of informal trail to the “real” summit.