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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

762 Hikes

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - East

 
1.3 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 712 ft.
Highest Point: 3843 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
5.00
(1 vote)
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
The Bygone Byways Interpretive Trail is an easy loop trail that follows the Great Northern Railway. The trail is entirely ADA-accessible and has several interpretive signs about the natural and cultural history of the area.
 
 

South Cascades > White Pass/Cowlitz River Valley

 
1.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 296 ft.
Highest Point: 1135 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(6 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Fall foliage
Woods Creek #247 is a 1.5 mile, compact gravel, wheelchair accessible trail that loops through five habitat areas. You can extend this hike, by taking the 1-mile side trail, Old growth Loop #247A.
 
 

Central Cascades > Entiat Mountains/Lake Chelan

 
15.25 miles, one-way
Gain: 2690 ft.
Highest Point: 5760 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.80
(5 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
A long, rambling gateway into the eastern side of Glacier Peak Wilderness, the Entiat River Trail culminates at its namesake glacier with Mount Maude, Seven Fingered Jack and Mount Fernow towering above. Ravaged by wildfires over the years, the majority of the trail is exposed, dry and dusty. Both flora and fauna are slowly returning and the revealed panorama of bordering peaks makes for an extraordinary wilderness corridor.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
19.9 miles, one-way
Gain: 900 ft.
Highest Point: 82 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.67
(3 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
A semi-urban multi-use trail running between Tukwila and South Park along the Duwamish River.
 
 

South Cascades > Mount Adams Area

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 825 ft.
Highest Point: 825 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
This hike is a nice, long road walk leading to a trail, a good alternate to the Klickitat Rail Trail for a change of scenery.
 
 

Southwest Washington > Vancouver Area

 
2.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 132 ft.
Highest Point: 54 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(1 vote)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
A gentle meandering barrier-free path leads through a mature cottonwood forest just west of Vancouver Lake. Although you can't see the lake through all the trees, there are other sights and sounds to enjoy along this route. Most notably the vibrant greens of the understory in spring, beautiful fall yellows and quite a few species of birds nearly all year.
 
 

Southwest Washington > Vancouver Area

 
2.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 548 ft.
Highest Point: 111 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
Peaceful is the best way to describe the Stewart Glen portion of the Burnt Bridge Creek Greenway. This hike begins at backwaters on the west end of Stewart Glen and follows the Burnt Bridge Creek upstream though thick woods, grassy bottom lands, and a meadow. You will be immediately immersed in the serenity of nature, making this the perfect break from city life.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
3.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 400 ft.
Highest Point: 4900 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.89
(18 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
This pleasant trail offers an almost level walk to a grassy forested lake set in the rocky basin beneath Cutthroat Peak. This is an easy hike in an area of rugged, steep country and one of the few that are suitable for small children. It is an especially pretty hike in the fall when the larch are turning golden.
 
 

Mount Rainier Area > Chinook Pass - Hwy 410

 
3.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1100 ft.
Highest Point: 5409 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.05
(22 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Summits
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
This is a nice, short hike to a recently repaired fire lookout. Guidebooks do not include recent upgrades to the trail and road to the trailhead. The trail is no longer only accessible via a scramble, but trail that switchbacks through wildflowers and interesting rock walls which was constructed in 2007. The lookout itself has been repaired, making it a nice lunch stop.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
11.5 miles, roundtrip
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(5 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
This temporary trail is slated for inclusion in Sound Transit's line. For now, it uses the old North Pacific Railroad grade as a quiet place for Kirkland residents to stretch their legs.
 
 

Mount Rainier Area > Chinook Pass - Hwy 410

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 150 ft.
Highest Point: 1300 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.67
(3 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
Located on the White River near Mount Rainier, the Mud Mountain Dam is both a flood control dam operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and a recreation facility. At about 3.5 miles from the trailhead, Scatter Creek makes the trail impassable.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > San Juan Islands

 
10.0 miles of trails
Gain: 223 ft.
Highest Point: 223 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.33
(6 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Coast
Far to the north, between the Strait of Georgia and the waters surrounding the San Juan Islands is a funny-shaped little island with a wealth of hiking trails on its relatively small square acreage.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Salmon La Sac/Teanaway

 
7.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 400 ft.
Highest Point: 2800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.46
(13 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
Kids will love this hike because there’s so much to see: a rushing river, a lush old-growth forest dotted with wildflowers and, if you’re lucky, plenty of wildlife.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - East

 
2.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 100 ft.
Highest Point: 1400 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.50
(8 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
Just west of the town of Leavenworth, the Tumwater Pipeline Trail offers a lovely riverside ramble at any time of year. Enjoy the high waters and flowers blooming in spring, photograph vivid color in fall, and try out your snowshoes in winter. Whatever the season, this is a beautiful, short walk for those looking for something easy and quick.
 
 

South Cascades > Mount St. Helens

 
10.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4500 ft.
Highest Point: 8365 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.46
(39 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Ridges/passes
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Summits
  • Fall foliage
Mount St. Helens is a peak that should be on every life list. And because it is an active volcano, it is best not to put it off for too long. Climbing to the crater rim is an opportunity to see not only amazing views in every direction, but to see geology raw, unformed and in its making.
 
 

North Cascades > Mountain Loop Highway

 
10.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3400 ft.
Highest Point: 5250 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.24
(29 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Summits
  • Waterfalls
Perry Creek proves you can have it all in a single hike – old-growth forest, wildflowers, waterfalls, meadows, expansive mountain views, even lakes! Tread lightly, though-due to its unparalleled diversity of native plants, the area between the summits of Stillaguamish Peak, Mount Forgotten, and Mount Dickerman is a research natural area that could (in theory) be closed to all uses but scientific study.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
4.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1050 ft.
Highest Point: 6254 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.39
(72 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
At 6254 feet, Blue Lake sits quietly a little over two trail miles from Highway 20. With towering granite peaks, forests, meadows, wildflowers, and of course the beautiful mountain lake surrounded by granite that reaches for the sky, this short hike is easily a classic and should be on your must-hike list. With only 1050 feet of elevation gain this hike is doable for almost everyone. If you’re driving over Highway 20 and don’t have all day, stop for this mountain gem.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
2.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 220 ft.
Highest Point: 1200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.61
(18 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers

Trail closed: Landslide on trail

Here's a Mount Baker Highway gem that's low enough to be passable all year and at the same time easy enough for the whole family. It's also a terrific spot to witness the power of water.
 
 

Mount Rainier Area > NW - Carbon River/Mowich

 
0.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 20 ft.
Highest Point: 1780 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.40
(5 votes)
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Wildlife
  • Fall foliage
The Carbon River Rain Forest Nature Trail is a pleasant and easy stroll that offers two short segments which can be combined to create a 0.6 mile roundtrip walk. Both paths penetrate primeval rain forest where giant ferns, maples, and spruce tower above charming cedar puncheon bridges and babbling brooks. This hike is great in any season, and takes on particular wildness in winter. Interpretive signs and photo opportunities abound.
 
 

North Cascades > Mountain Loop Highway

 
0.25 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.67
(6 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage

Trail Closed

A paved interpretive trail on the Mountain Loop Highway near Verlot. Perfect for exploring children, curious adults, an extra add-on after a longer hike, or a leg stretch during a driving tour of the area.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
2.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 50 ft.
Highest Point: 300 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.71
(7 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
The Queets Campground Loop is a quintessential rainforest experience. At just under three miles, it provides visitors with a generous variety of nature. Giant spruce and hemlock rise above great galleries of fern and oxalis. The wind whispers the memories of abandoned homesteads in the grasses of shrinking meadows. Owls hoot and frogs croak the song of an ancient melody. One stands here often and wonders.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
4.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 500 ft.
Highest Point: 800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.75
(4 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
Formerly a trail that bordered Lake Mills, the Smokey Bottom trail winds through the second-growth forest along the now free-flowing Elwha River.
 
 

Southwest Washington > Columbia River Gorge - WA

 
13.0 miles, one-way
Gain: 450 ft.
Highest Point: 1550 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.67
(3 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage

The Swale Canyon section (Wahkiakus to Harms Road) of the Klickitat Rail Trail is closed until late October due to a high fire hazard rating.

The Klickitat Rail Trail is a 31-mile rails-to-trails conversion managed by Columbia Hills State Park. This linear park goes from Lyle to Warwick (on the Lyle-Centerville Highway) with several access points along the way. Swale Canyon lies on the eastern end of the trail and offers a quiet canyon, a burbly creek, wildflowers and solitude.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
4.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1500 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.07
(14 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage

6/7/2022 Road Closed: This trailhead is inaccessible

Dock Butte boasts sweeping views of Mount Baker, Baker Lake, and several prominent peaks in the North Cascades and Olympic Peninsula. It is a great option for beginner hikers looking to up their hiking game as well as those looking for exceptional mountain views without the mileage and time commitment of a longer hike.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
4.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1800 ft.
Highest Point: 1825 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.50
(6 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Summits
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Fall foliage
Cascade Rock used to be accessible from the backyard of many sites at the Elwha Campground, but with the removal of the Elwha Dam, this campground has flooded multiple times and the campground is closed. Luckily though, you can still hike Cascade Rock, and its such a secret trail, you're likely to have it to yourself.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
10.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2480 ft.
Highest Point: 4300 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(5 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
This is a well-engineered trail of moderate grade that makes a 2.8-mile switchback free ascent from the intersection of the Appleton Pass Trail to the shores of green-tinted Boulder Lake. Along the way you will ramble through some great stands of fir and hemlock and pull in some panoramic views to the south including the north slopes of Mount Appleton.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
1.7 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 300 ft.
Highest Point: 3984 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.06
(16 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage

6/7/2022 Road Closed: This trailhead is inaccessible

One of several Blue Lakes in Washington State, this Blue Lake lies about four and a half miles south of Mount Baker and requires less than a mile of hiking to reach it. Its translucent blue-green colors peek out beneath the shadows of a sheer rock wall partially encircling the lake, a reward for conquering the somewhat eroded and rooty trail that leads to it. Families, anglers, and hikers looking to experience a pretty subalpine lake will enjoy this short, yet memorable hike.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
15.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3230 ft.
Highest Point: 5050 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.67
(6 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Established campsites
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Waterfalls
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Fall foliage
The trail to Appleton Pass is only 7.7 miles, but it hikes longer. The route offers some rewarding diversions along the way, but much of the payoff is in the last 1.5 miles with sweeping views as one ascends the meadows and traverses the switchbacks to Appleton Pass. Plan for an early start to your day in order to enjoy lunch, and perhaps even a restorative nap, at Appleton Pass.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Bellingham Area

 
1.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 192 ft.
Highest Point: 157 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(4 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Coast
This hike boasts a great combination of wetland and sea shore. It is doable by hikers of all ages, and most of the trail is wheelchair accessible
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
7.3 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 797 ft.
Highest Point: 452 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(2 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
You can visit several parks along the way of this urban trail including Celebration Park, Madrona Park and Panther Lake Park. It is also passes by the Weyerhaeuser King County Aquatic Centre. The paved path is ADA accessible and allows leashed dogs.