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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

771 Hikes

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
4.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 880 ft.
Highest Point: 1790 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.58
(12 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
Head for Pack Forest and Hugo Peak when you want some exercise but don't have a full day to commit as it is only 10 minutes from Eatonville. The trail is well maintained and there is a hiking register at the top. It's also a great hike for kids when they're ready to stretch their legs.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Okanogan Highlands/Kettle River Range

 
1.6 miles, one-way
Gain: 553 ft.
Highest Point: 6048 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.25
(4 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
A trail wide enough for a stage coach, which was its original and still permitted use, Old Stage Trail No. 75 serves as the main feeder trail to the Kettle Crest National Recreation Trail for access to nearby Copper Butte.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
9.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1800 ft.
Highest Point: 2000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.60
(5 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers

This trail is closed due to damage from the Pincer Creek Fire. Closure anticipated to last until at least December 2022

A hidden gem revealed! The South Fork Cascade Trail was in the Mineral Park Fire of 2003, but recent efforts by WTA crews and other volunteer organizations have helped reopen a section of it, and continue to repair it.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
0.7 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 0 ft.
Highest Point: 906 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers

Road washout: The Boyd Creek trailhead is inaccessible by car due to a road washout

This less-than-a-mile boardwalk hike is a lovely way to get outside and enjoy a little forest time in a cathedral of trees.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
5.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1400 ft.
Highest Point: 5100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.46
(46 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage

The road to this trailhead is washed out. Closure is anticipated to last until January 2023

If you'd like nose-to-nose access to Mount Baker, this first-rate woodsy walk delivers. Over a relatively short, well-maintained trail with mild elevation gain, you can be glacier-side in no time... if the creek crossings allow.
 
 

North Cascades > Pasayten

 
11.0 miles, one-way
Gain: 4050 ft.
Highest Point: 8100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(5 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Mountain views
  • Summits
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
Follow this rugged trail through a former burn to views of Mount Baker and the expansive Pasayten Wilderness.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
2.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 584 ft.
Highest Point: 552 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(1 vote)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Wildlife
  • Fall foliage
This 2.5 mile loop is in Dosewallips State Park right out of the campground. You'll enjoy a moderate climb, which meanders up, down, and all around the park. Amble past waterfalls, through a valley lined with bigleaf maples and western redcedar before switchbacking up to a ridgeline, then return to the campground via a gentle downhill grade.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Salmon La Sac/Teanaway

 
3.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1000 ft.
Highest Point: 4800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.43
(7 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
This short trail guides hikers through open forest to a junction with the Kachess Ridge Trail, where you can continue on to Thorp Lookout or just a little longer wander along the ridge.
 
 

North Cascades > Methow/Sawtooth

 
24.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4200 ft.
Highest Point: 8000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.25
(4 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Summits
  • Lakes
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Fall foliage
This is a classic multi-day backpack ideal in larch season.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Taylor Mountain

 
3.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 527 ft.
Highest Point: 888 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
This popular path for horseback riders follows a gentle grade along Carey Creek to connect with the Taylor Mountain trail network.
 
 

Issaquah Alps

 
0.8 miles, one-way
Gain: 153 ft.
Highest Point: 463 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
The Waterline Trail is part of the extensive trail network in the city of Newcastle. It connects to the May Valley Trail, passes by Lake Boren Park and ends at Newcastle Way with connections on to various other trails.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Olympia

 
1.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 194 ft.
Highest Point: 220 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(2 votes)
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
A peaceful walk around the wetlands, this is the perfect stroll for someone who wants to experience a little chunk of nature. The tract of wetlands is well-preserved despite being close to town, making the park an attraction for bird-watchers and plant-lovers in the city of Olympia.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Okanogan Highlands/Kettle River Range

 
24.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3000 ft.
Highest Point: 3930 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(1 vote)
  • Wildlife
  • Summits
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
This trail offers vistas of the Okanogan River and Pasayten Wilderness as well as wildlife viewing potential for hikers of all experience levels.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
0.6 miles, one-way
Gain: 313 ft.
Highest Point: 1668 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
A connector trail between the Boulder Garden Loop to the main Mount Si trail in the Mount Si Natural Resources Conservation Area.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Olympia

 
0.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 139 ft.
Highest Point: 175 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
This short and sweet neighborhood trail on the west side of Olympia will take hikers through a quiet forested ravine and out to views of the Puget Sound.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Cougar Mountain

 
0.2 miles, one-way
Gain: 22 ft.
Highest Point: 1072 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.50
(4 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
A short connector trail between Bear Ridge and Shangri La trails that creates a loop out of the two. Also connect to Red Cedars via the No Name Trail.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Tiger Mountain

 
0.3 miles, one-way
Gain: 57 ft.
Highest Point: 1508 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
The Connector Trail does what it says it will do and leads from the parking area to many other trails within the East Tiger Trail System.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
1.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 67 ft.
Highest Point: 247 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(4 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
This delightful little park is part of the Olympic Discovery Trail, which means you can hike as far as time allows, or as little as you like. You'll see salmon spawning in the fall, interpretive signs year round, and can watch the seasons turn by visiting as often as you like.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
6.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 439 ft.
Highest Point: 77 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.67
(6 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
Named for a Duwamish chief who led a village on Lake Union, this six-mile, mostly-paved urban loop connects pocket parks and multi-use paths around Lake Union in Seattle. If you don't stop for a bite to eat in one of the neighborhoods along the way, Gasworks Park (on the north side of the loop) and Lake Union Park (on the south side) both make great picnic spots with lake views.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Palouse and Blue Mountains

 
5.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1400 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
5.00
(1 vote)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
Canyon hike starting at the Snake River.
 
 

North Cascades > Mountain Loop Highway

 
4.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 650 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.76
(21 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
A nice afternoon hike near Darrington up an abandoned road to an old mine.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - East

 
1.3 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 712 ft.
Highest Point: 3843 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
5.00
(1 vote)
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
The Bygone Byways Interpretive Trail is an easy loop trail that follows the Great Northern Railway. The trail is entirely ADA-accessible and has several interpretive signs about the natural and cultural history of the area.
 
 

South Cascades > White Pass/Cowlitz River Valley

 
1.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 296 ft.
Highest Point: 1135 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(6 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Fall foliage
Woods Creek #247 is a 1.5 mile, compact gravel, wheelchair accessible trail that loops through five habitat areas. You can extend this hike, by taking the 1-mile side trail, Old growth Loop #247A.
 
 

Central Cascades > Entiat Mountains/Lake Chelan

 
15.25 miles, one-way
Gain: 2690 ft.
Highest Point: 5760 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.80
(5 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
A long, rambling gateway into the eastern side of Glacier Peak Wilderness, the Entiat River Trail culminates at its namesake glacier with Mount Maude, Seven Fingered Jack and Mount Fernow towering above. Ravaged by wildfires over the years, the majority of the trail is exposed, dry and dusty. Both flora and fauna are slowly returning and the revealed panorama of bordering peaks makes for an extraordinary wilderness corridor.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
19.9 miles, one-way
Gain: 900 ft.
Highest Point: 82 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.67
(3 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
A semi-urban multi-use trail running between Tukwila and South Park along the Duwamish River.
 
 

South Cascades > Mount Adams Area

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 825 ft.
Highest Point: 825 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
This hike is a nice, long road walk leading to a trail, a good alternate to the Klickitat Rail Trail for a change of scenery.
 
 

Southwest Washington > Vancouver Area

 
2.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 132 ft.
Highest Point: 54 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(1 vote)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
A gentle meandering barrier-free path leads through a mature cottonwood forest just west of Vancouver Lake. Although you can't see the lake through all the trees, there are other sights and sounds to enjoy along this route. Most notably the vibrant greens of the understory in spring, beautiful fall yellows and quite a few species of birds nearly all year.
 
 

Southwest Washington > Vancouver Area

 
2.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 548 ft.
Highest Point: 111 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
Peaceful is the best way to describe the Stewart Glen portion of the Burnt Bridge Creek Greenway. This hike begins at backwaters on the west end of Stewart Glen and follows the Burnt Bridge Creek upstream though thick woods, grassy bottom lands, and a meadow. You will be immediately immersed in the serenity of nature, making this the perfect break from city life.
 
 

Mount Rainier Area > Chinook Pass - Hwy 410

 
3.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1100 ft.
Highest Point: 5409 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.05
(22 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Summits
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
This is a nice, short hike to a recently repaired fire lookout. Guidebooks do not include recent upgrades to the trail and road to the trailhead. The trail is no longer only accessible via a scramble, but trail that switchbacks through wildflowers and interesting rock walls which was constructed in 2007. The lookout itself has been repaired, making it a nice lunch stop.
 
 

Mount Rainier Area > Chinook Pass - Hwy 410

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 150 ft.
Highest Point: 1300 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.67
(3 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
Located on the White River near Mount Rainier, the Mud Mountain Dam is both a flood control dam operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and a recreation facility. At about 3.5 miles from the trailhead, Scatter Creek makes the trail impassable.