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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

763 Hikes

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
7.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2000 ft.
Highest Point: 6650 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.83
(122 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
If ever there was a hike to satisfy all a hiker's desires, this one comes as close as any. A loop hike with many fabulous changing faces throughout the seasons, Heather-Maple Pass features ridgelines blanketed in wildflowers in summer, lakes ringed with golden larches in fall, and before the highway closes for the season, a dramatic place to experience early winter’s snows.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1800 ft.
Highest Point: 5392 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.20
(35 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Waterfalls
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
At Cascade Pass, the wow factor far exceeds the “ow” factor – perhaps no other trail in the state delivers as much reward for the effort. From the high peaks on either side of the pass, verdant meadows curve down to a saddle that offers sweeping views of nearby valleys, glaciers, mountains, and passing wildlife. Sedately climbing a little less than 1,800 feet in 3.6 miles, it is the perfect hike to show new hikers the extraordinary places their feet can take them.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
12.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4000 ft.
Highest Point: 7570 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.44
(66 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Lakes
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Fall foliage
In Sahale Arm, the forces of nature have conspired to create an improbably gentle, gorgeous landscape. A scenic trail ambles peacefully through rolling alpine meadows blanketing the broad shoulder of Sahale Mountain. This park-like setting is made all the more spectacular by contrast with the dramatic mountainous terrain that stretches off in every direction near and far. Simply put, this is one of the most beautiful hikes in all of Washington.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3300 ft.
Highest Point: 6900 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.63
(65 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Fall foliage
  • Mountain views
  • Summits
  • Lakes
  • Waterfalls
The Hidden Lake trail is one of the crown jewels of hiking in Washington State. No other trail offers so much as Hidden Lake Lookout: forest, wildflowers, a true alpine environment of stark granite well above treeline, breathtaking summit views of the heart of North Cascades National Park, and a fire lookout with a sweeping history almost as big as the mountainous landscape it gazes over.
 
 

Central Cascades > Entiat Mountains/Lake Chelan

 
3.3 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 600 ft.
Highest Point: 2180 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.33
(3 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
Just behind the High Bridge Guard Station at the end of the road in Stehekin, a trail leads to a quiet little lake nestled in lush, vibrant forest. This trail is primarily used by hikers heading to the summit of McGregor Mountain, the most prominent peak towering over the Stehekin Valley, but Howard Lake is a nice destination in and of itself, if you don’t have the time or the desire to tackle the 16 mile roundtrip hike up McGregor.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
16.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2650 ft.
Highest Point: 5700 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.10
(29 votes)
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Fall foliage
You will see plenty in the first 7.2 miles of this trip that take you to the shores of Royal Lake, but you should plan your hike to have the time –and energy -- to enjoy the wildflower-dotted alpine basin and its milky blue tarns in Upper Royal Basin about three-quarters of a mile past the lake.
 
 

Central Cascades > Entiat Mountains/Lake Chelan

 
17.0 miles, one-way
Gain: 4030 ft.
Highest Point: 1700 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(20 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
Looking for an early-season backpack featuring craggy, snow-capped peaks, a sapphire-blue lake, a myriad of wildflowers, and a trail that’s regularly maintained by WTA volunteers? The 17-mile thru-hike on the Chelan Lakeshore Trail might be just the thing for you.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
2.0 miles of trails
Rating:
Average rating:
3.33
(3 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Coast
This popular state park is nestled on a stretch of shoreline between the urban centers of Seattle and Tacoma, so unsurprisingly, it's a frequently-visited location. Share the beach, share the views, and enjoy the atmosphere here.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
2.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 140 ft.
Highest Point: 325 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.68
(38 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Coast
Seattle's Discovery Park Loop Trail is a designated National Recreation Trail, 2.8 miles long with an elevation change of just 140 feet. It passes through both forest and open meadows, offers extensive views, good prospects for bird watchers, and it can be hiked or jogged year-round.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3400 ft.
Highest Point: 5240 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.24
(115 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Mountain views
  • Summits
  • Waterfalls
There are two sides to Bandera Mountain – gentle and well groomed on the one hand, rough and untamed on the other. Together, they make for a very satisfying hike along a rocky ridge to a false summit (Little Bandera) with views impressive enough to dissuade most from completing the final half mile of informal trail to the “real” summit.
 
 

North Cascades > Mountain Loop Highway

 
29.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 7500 ft.
Highest Point: 6360 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.81
(16 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Summits
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Fall foliage
A loop hike, beginning and ending in the old-growth forests of the North Fork Sauk River that traverses high ridges and passes of the Pacific crest, visits beautiful alpine lakes, and finally follows the high and lonesome Pilot Ridge Trail before descending back down to the trail junction on the North Fork Sauk River.
 
 

Mount Rainier Area > SE - Cayuse Pass/Stevens Canyon

 
3.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 600 ft.
Highest Point: 5850 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.52
(66 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
This popular hike provides a range of alpine experiences in a short loop. Walk along a hillside above a small valley, pause at a viewpoint overlooking a lake, and stroll through grassy meadows with stunning views of Mount Rainier. In season enjoy an abundance of wildflowers or perhaps a handful of huckleberries.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
7.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2200 ft.
Highest Point: 5450 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.56
(68 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Summits
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Waterfalls
  • Fall foliage
On Park Butte, hike to an historic fire lookout and come face-to-face with Koma Kulshan. Along with unobstructed panoramic views of Mount Baker, the Twin Sisters, and the rest of the North Cascades, the route to Park Butte offers dedicated campsites, wildflower-filled alpine meadows, rushing waterfalls, and a stunning variety of mushroom species.
 
 

Mount Rainier Area > SE - Cayuse Pass/Stevens Canyon

 
8.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3434 ft.
Highest Point: 5834 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.76
(17 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
  • Ridges/passes
Gorgeous weather and late-season color make this one of the most beautiful autumn hikes in Mount Rainier National Park. This hike is a tough climb, but the payoff is great views and lots of solitude.
 
 

Central Cascades > Leavenworth Area

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2280 ft.
Highest Point: 5580 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.41
(104 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Summits
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
Set beneath two of Washington’s tallest peaks, Colchuck Lake is an alpine gem. It is a larger cousin to the nearby fabled Enchantment Lakes and offers many of the same payoffs – including groves of larches on its far shore – but can be reached with less than half the effort.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
7.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2550 ft.
Highest Point: 6150 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.46
(65 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Ridges/passes

Campfires are not allowed in this area.

Find supreme wildflower gardens and a high-country plateau speckled with shimmering tarns-but that's not all. Spectacular alpine vistas abound too-of Baker, Shuksan, and all those rugged and craggy peaks straddling the 49th parallel. Yellow Aster Butte may be a misnomer (those yellow-petaled delights are actually daisies), but you definitely don't want to miss hiking here.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Tiger Mountain

 
0.5 miles, one-way
Gain: 163 ft.
Highest Point: 2657 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
The Quick Link Trail is a short segment in the middle of the east tiger trail system. Combine this trail with others to form any number of loop hikes, including a trip to the east tiger summit.
 
 

Central Washington > Yakima

 
4.0 miles, (type not yet set)
Gain: 1000 ft.
Highest Point: 3000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
A popular camping and birding spot, this area is best known for its free (with Discover Pass) camping, but has some nice hiking options as well.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
1.9 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 353 ft.
Highest Point: 2604 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.67
(6 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Rivers
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Waterfalls
This comfortable, easy to follow trail winds through intermittent old growth, occasional remnants of the past, and alongside a sometimes babbling and other times a crashing creek. You will follow the original Snoqualmie Pass Wagon Road, and it is possible to connect with the trail to Franklin Falls for a scenic and delightful 2-mile loop.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Spokane Area/Coeur d'Alene

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2119 ft.
Highest Point: 4554 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage

Logging operations: Trail 120 is closed to all users

The trails on Mount Spokane interlace, offering opportunities to create long or short hikes. Trail 120 allows hikers to loop onto the Kit Carson Trail and beyond.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Olympia

 
1.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 238 ft.
Highest Point: 201 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(3 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Coast
In Washington, trails can be found just about anywhere. This one takes off from Parking Lot F on the campus of Evergreen State College! A short hike down to a lovely little beach, this is just the ticket for students and families alike.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
5.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2000 ft.
Highest Point: 5459 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.32
(19 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Ridges/passes
  • Summits
  • Fall foliage
Hike up an abandoned road, through a logged area, and into mature forest on the edge of the Alpine Lakes wilderness. What the trail lacks in ruggedness is more than made up for by the quantity of berries that line the trail.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
4.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 880 ft.
Highest Point: 1790 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.58
(12 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
Head for Pack Forest and Hugo Peak when you want some exercise but don't have a full day to commit as it is only 10 minutes from Eatonville. The trail is well maintained and there is a hiking register at the top. It's also a great hike for kids when they're ready to stretch their legs.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Selkirk Range

 
1.8 miles, one-way
Gain: 1085 ft.
Highest Point: 5434 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.33
(3 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Old growth
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
The Shedroof Cutoff Trail serves as a short feeder trail to the Shedroof Divide Trail in the Salmo Priest Wilderness.
 
 

Mount Rainier Area > NW - Carbon River/Mowich

 
16.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 5100 ft.
Highest Point: 6375 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.87
(15 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Established campsites
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Waterfalls
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
Considered one of the best loop hikes in Mount Rainier National Park, the trail through the alpine meadows of Spray and Seattle Parks blazes with a bounty of seasonal wildflowers. Throw in an ample serving of glassy tarns, a couple of wispy waterfalls, an optional side trip to Carbon Glacier and a forested stroll up Ipsut Creek, and you have a photographer’s dreamland.
 
 

Mount Rainier Area > NW - Carbon River/Mowich

 
10.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 500 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.60
(10 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
Due to the permanent closure of the Carbon River Road, hikers can now park at the closure and venture to the end of the road to the viewpoint for Ipsut Falls. Along the way, you'll hike through magnificent old-growth forest, and many opportunities to see the power of the Carbon River.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
10.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2200 ft.
Highest Point: 4857 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.40
(35 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
Gem Lake is nestled at the foot of Wright Mountain and is about two miles beyond the trail junction at Rock Creek trail #1013.1 that intersects with the Snow Lake trail starting at Alpental. Beautiful colors surround the lake in autumn as do the many climbable peaks in the area.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Okanogan Highlands/Kettle River Range

 
1.6 miles, one-way
Gain: 553 ft.
Highest Point: 6048 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.25
(4 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
A trail wide enough for a stage coach, which was its original and still permitted use, Old Stage Trail No. 75 serves as the main feeder trail to the Kettle Crest National Recreation Trail for access to nearby Copper Butte.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
9.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1800 ft.
Highest Point: 2000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.60
(5 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers

This trail is closed due to damage from the Pincer Creek Fire. Closure anticipated to last until at least December 2022

A hidden gem revealed! The South Fork Cascade Trail was in the Mineral Park Fire of 2003, but recent efforts by WTA crews and other volunteer organizations have helped reopen a section of it, and continue to repair it.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
0.7 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 0 ft.
Highest Point: 906 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers

Road washout: The Boyd Creek trailhead is inaccessible by car due to a road washout

This less-than-a-mile boardwalk hike is a lovely way to get outside and enjoy a little forest time in a cathedral of trees.