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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

56 Hikes

South Cascades > White Pass/Cowlitz River Valley

 
0.25 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 100 ft.
Highest Point: 2400 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.89
(9 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
The short Layser Cave interpretive trail is a quick detour off the main route south of Randle that transports visitors into the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The trail takes just a half-hour to hike and provides a nice immersion into the human history of the area.
 
 

Central Washington > Potholes Region

 
1.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 0 ft.
Highest Point: 1060 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
The interpretive trail around Marsh Lake is a lovely, short stroll around a large lake in Central Washington. You may see migrating birds or just get a load of the lovely grasslands here.
 
 

Central Cascades > Entiat Mountains/Lake Chelan

 
1.3 miles of trails
Gain: 15 ft.
Highest Point: 800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(1 vote)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Rivers
This interpretive center offers three different short trails for visitors to explore the history of firefighting and fire lookouts in the Entiat Valley, as well as learn a bit about plant and fire ecology.
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
4.7 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 572 ft.
Highest Point: 353 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Rivers
Extending from the family-friendly Wetland Wildlife Interpretive Trail at Howard Miller Steelhead Park, the Skagit–Sauk Reach Trail stretches toward the confluence of the Skagit and Sauk Rivers before looping back toward the camping area at the park.
 
 

Southwest Washington > Columbia River Gorge - WA

 
2.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 40 ft.
Highest Point: 1200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
Visit a historic arboretum on connected paths that form a 2 mile interpretive trail, with the option to do shorter loops.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
2.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 0 ft.
Highest Point: 25 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Rivers
An interpretive trail outside of Forks. Great for a midday walk or a leg stretch during a long drive.
 
 
 
0.58 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 35 ft.
Highest Point: 2200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
The Arboretum Loop Trail is a short interpretive trail within the Indian Creek Community Forest.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Bellingham Area

 
2.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.75
(8 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Established campsites
  • Coast
This is more of a stroll than a hike . It is of historical interest with interpretive signs along the way. Beach walking is also present. Fort Casey was one of three forts chosen in 1896 to form a triangle for protection of Puget Sound. Fort Worden and Fort Flagler were the other two. All have become State Parks. Their use for coastal protection proved to be impractical so their use became a place for instruction and training of troops during both of the world wars.
 
 

Central Washington > Potholes Region

 
3.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 2600 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(12 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Wildlife

08/01/2022: Wildfire - Trail Closed

One of the largest petrified forests on the planet sits in the center of Washington State. The ancient trees were mineralized into rock during the great lava flows that swept the inland Northwest. In addition to petrified ginkgos (one of the oldest tree species in the world), the "rock forest" includes mineralized Douglas fir, spruce, walnut, and elm.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Bellingham Area

 
1.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 124 ft.
Highest Point: 165 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.75
(4 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Coast
This family-friendly educational center features a short nature trail that will take you through forests and meadows. At low-tide, you can also explore down onto the beach via path away from the center and a spiral staircase.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
0.7 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 0 ft.
Highest Point: 906 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers

Road washout: The Boyd Creek trailhead is inaccessible by car due to a road washout

This less-than-a-mile boardwalk hike is a lovely way to get outside and enjoy a little forest time in a cathedral of trees.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Whidbey Island

 
0.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 31 ft.
Highest Point: 32 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.80
(5 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Coast
A stroll along the sand dunes of Deception State Park's West Beach offers a glimpse into this important geologic feature. The way is easy and interpretive signs provide information about the interesting seaside vegetation unique to this area.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
1.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 67 ft.
Highest Point: 247 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(4 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
This delightful little park is part of the Olympic Discovery Trail, which means you can hike as far as time allows, or as little as you like. You'll see salmon spawning in the fall, interpretive signs year round, and can watch the seasons turn by visiting as often as you like.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - East

 
1.3 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 712 ft.
Highest Point: 3843 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
5.00
(1 vote)
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
The Bygone Byways Interpretive Trail is an easy loop trail that follows the Great Northern Railway. The trail is entirely ADA-accessible and has several interpretive signs about the natural and cultural history of the area.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > San Juan Islands

 
1.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 210 ft.
Highest Point: 158 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Good for kids
  • Coast
Take this short one-mile stroll around an interpretive trail near the base of Mount Finlayson on San Juan Island.
 
 

Mount Rainier Area > NW - Carbon River/Mowich

 
0.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 20 ft.
Highest Point: 1780 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.40
(5 votes)
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Wildlife
  • Fall foliage
The Carbon River Rain Forest Nature Trail is a pleasant and easy stroll that offers two short segments which can be combined to create a 0.6 mile roundtrip walk. Both paths penetrate primeval rain forest where giant ferns, maples, and spruce tower above charming cedar puncheon bridges and babbling brooks. This hike is great in any season, and takes on particular wildness in winter. Interpretive signs and photo opportunities abound.
 
 

North Cascades > Mountain Loop Highway

 
0.25 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.67
(6 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage

Trail Closed

A paved interpretive trail on the Mountain Loop Highway near Verlot. Perfect for exploring children, curious adults, an extra add-on after a longer hike, or a leg stretch during a driving tour of the area.
 
 

Southwest Washington > Columbia River Gorge - WA

 
1.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 174 ft.
Highest Point: 1270 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.50
(4 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Wildlife
In logging's heyday, whistle punks were men tasked with operating the signal that let other loggers know a log had been hooked up and was ready to be moved. Using interpretive signage, this trail illustrates what was like to be on a logging show, from the crew, to the cook, to camp.
 
 

Southwest Washington > Long Beach Area

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 614 ft.
Highest Point: 103 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.50
(6 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Rivers
Walking along this old railroad bed offers insight into the history, ecology, and biology of the Chehalis River Surge Plain. Surge plains are rare, and the interpretive trail along this route helps highlight the important part they play in a healthy ecosystem.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
1.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 250 ft.
Highest Point: 450 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.62
(39 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Rivers
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Waterfalls
The 0.7-mile interpretive trail from the upper falls viewpoints to the lower falls viewpoint is family- and pet-friendly, good for beginners, teaches the basics of the flora and fauna near Snoqualmie Pass, informs about local Native American culture, and ends with impressive views of a Washington icon.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
0.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 100 ft.
Highest Point: 4400 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.60
(5 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
The Fire and Ice trail is the Mount Baker area's premiere interpretive trail, telling the story of how glaciers and volcanoes shaped this impressive place.
 
 

Central Cascades > Leavenworth Area

 
4.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 150 ft.
Highest Point: 2800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.20
(20 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Waterfalls
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
The Icicle Gorge Trail, one of the most popular trails in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, is a wonderful way to explore the natural beauty of the Icicle Creek Valley. The interpretive loop trail has a gentle grade and scenic views of Icicle Creek, Icicle Gorge, and the surrounding forest that are ideal for families, trail runners, beginner hikers, bird enthusiasts, and those looking to take a nice long walk on a well-defined path.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
0.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 100 ft.
Highest Point: 100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Waterfalls
This is a lovely trail year-round. If you don’t live in the area, it makes an excellent quick stop if you’re in the vicinity of the Hood Canal Bridge.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
0.75 miles of trails
Gain: 94 ft.
Highest Point: 143 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
1.00
(1 vote)
Bleakly urban, curiously varied; this are is dramatically unique despite its diminutive stature. Select from two short walks -- a short hill climb or a wander through river bottom with interpretive signs.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Bellingham Area

 
4.9 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 300 ft.
Highest Point: 800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.29
(7 votes)
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Wildlife
  • Waterfalls
Take a stroll through 350 acres of undisturbed old-growth forest and thriving wetland ecosystem at the Stimpson Family Nature Reserve, a quiet place where hikers can experience the intricate grandeur of nature. Interpretive signs encourage adults and children to discover the nature of the reserve.
 
 

Central Cascades > Entiat Mountains/Lake Chelan

 
1.2 miles, roundtrip
Highest Point: 2400 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.00
(4 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
With a flat grade and plenty of benches and signs, this trail makes for a calming stroll through a beautiful area, no matter the occasion.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
WTA does not recommend winter use on the Iron Goat Trail due to avalanche danger and lack of parking. The Iron Goat Scenic Interpretive Site is also closed in winter.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
0.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 50 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.76
(17 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Waterfalls
The short half-mile interpretive trail along Deception Falls is a great stop for a quick stretch of the legs as you drive over Stevens Pass. The highlight is the tumbling, multi-tiered waterfall and its distinctive 90 degree turn the creek makes at a stop along the way.
 
 

Central Cascades > Blewett Pass

 
2.45 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 660 ft.
Highest Point: 4530 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.92
(13 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Old growth
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
This popular summer trail offers a wonderful place to learn about woodland ecosystems with 25 different interpretive stops. Wandering just under three miles through woods and meadows near the summit of Blewett Pass, With five log benches throughout providing fascinating views. It also gives insight into an area recovering after a burn towards the end of the trail.
 
 

Southwest Washington > Long Beach Area

 
1.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 260 ft.
Highest Point: 140 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(1 vote)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Coast
Tucked off of Spur Road 100, the opposite direction from the Cape Disappointment State Park camping area, the Coastal Forest Loop offers a chance to experience the signature environment of this area in either a half mile or mile and a half loop. Be sure to snag the brochure offered at the park office with interpretive information corresponding to posts along the way.