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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

99 Hikes

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
22.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 600 ft.
Highest Point: 800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.91
(11 votes)
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Old growth
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
The Queets River Trail is legendary for both its wild rainforest scenery and for the challenges it presents to the hiker. To begin, the trail can only be accessed after fording the glacier-born Queets River itself. Across the river, the trail is primitive and remote. Most hikers skip this trail either because of the ford or because it dead ends at 11 miles. But anglers and Olympiphiles hold a special place for this valley in their hearts.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
18.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4400 ft.
Highest Point: 5280 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.75
(4 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Lakes
Enjoy a mix of solitude and company along a ridgetop with two backcountry lakes and sweeping alpine views.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
7.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 600 ft.
Highest Point: 1300 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.17
(6 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Rivers
Follow in the footsteps of the intrepid Press Expedition while enjoying the natural beauty, local history and wildlife along the Olympic Peninsula’s Elwha River.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
13.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1200 ft.
Highest Point: 2500 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.17
(6 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
Take a long, rolling trail deep into quiet forest. Admire enormous trees, see a historic cabin, and find true solitude on the banks of Lillian River.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
10.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2480 ft.
Highest Point: 4300 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(5 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
This is a well-engineered trail of moderate grade that makes a 2.8-mile switchback free ascent from the intersection of the Appleton Pass Trail to the shores of green-tinted Boulder Lake. Along the way you will ramble through some great stands of fir and hemlock and pull in some panoramic views to the south including the north slopes of Mount Appleton.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
15.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3230 ft.
Highest Point: 5050 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.67
(6 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Established campsites
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Waterfalls
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Fall foliage
The trail to Appleton Pass is only 7.7 miles, but it hikes longer. The route offers some rewarding diversions along the way, but much of the payoff is in the last 1.5 miles with sweeping views as one ascends the meadows and traverses the switchbacks to Appleton Pass. Plan for an early start to your day in order to enjoy lunch, and perhaps even a restorative nap, at Appleton Pass.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
3.3 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 286 ft.
Highest Point: 71 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.19
(27 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Established campsites
  • Coast
Spend a day strolling the rugged Olympic Coast to dramatic sea stacks and natural wonders.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
11.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3489 ft.
Highest Point: 6000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.47
(72 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Rivers
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
Marmot Pass offers great views and a gentle hike through old-growth forest as well as high meadows. It is a great day hike, but also offers a great starting place for a variety of overnight options.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
11.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3400 ft.
Highest Point: 5700 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.25
(12 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Lakes
  • Established campsites
  • Ridges/passes
These quiet little lakes tucked on the south side of Mount Townsend make a delightful respite from the hordes that are trucking up Townsend. And, like Townsend, there are several ways to access them.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
7.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1600 ft.
Highest Point: 4600 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.33
(9 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
This short dayhike also offers campsites near the site of an old B-17 crash site. Please leave what you see so others may discover this historic site as you do.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
12.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2000 ft.
Highest Point: 5200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(16 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Ridges/passes
  • Lakes
Although best known for its namesake mine and the nearby aircraft wreckage, the Tubal Cain trail also offers a pleasant and scenic route to Marmot Pass, a gateway to further wanderings.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
18.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 6050 ft.
Highest Point: 6866 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(8 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Summits
  • Lakes
A scramble and climbing route to the summit of a mountain in the Olympic range. Climbing gear and expertise required.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
6.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 150 ft.
Highest Point: 100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.11
(9 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Established campsites
  • Coast
A beautiful hike through an interesting forest, often over boardwalks, ends at the beach with the potential for birdwatching and wildlife viewing. If you plan ahead and get a permit, it's a nice overnight destination.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.40
(62 votes)
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Coast
  • Good for kids
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
This stunning Olympic coastal hike is one of the more photographed places in Washington for good reason.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
12.9 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1890 ft.
Highest Point: 2943 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.60
(15 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Rivers
The Lower Big Quilcene Trail begins just outside the Buckhorn Wilderness and follows the lower Big Quilcene River along a mostly non-technical tread for approximately 6.5 miles. The moss-lined route starts on an old road bed through younger forest and then winds past large old-growth cedars. In spring and summer, blooming rhododendrons add vibrant color to your journey. This trail is also a great choice during the fall and winter months because the trees provide shelter from precipitation.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
17.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3200 ft.
Highest Point: 5050 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.33
(6 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Fall foliage
The Sol Duc River Trail is one of Olympic National Park’s most beloved hikes. Thus it is always crowded and a backcountry camping quota is enforced. Roaring waterfalls, lush old growth, and subalpine meadows where elk bugle and bears browse for berries are just some of the many highlights.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
6.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 100 ft.
Highest Point: 350 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.55
(11 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Rivers
  • Good for kids
  • Coast
Take a beautifully constructed boardwalk a little more than three miles out to the wild Olympic Coast. If you can snag a permit, camping here is divine. If not, while away a few hours playing in the water or ambling along the beach.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
12.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2500 ft.
Highest Point: 2700 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.78
(9 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Rivers
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
The Lower Dungeness Trail travels through mostly conifer forests high above the river with a fair bit of elevation gain for a river hike.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
10.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 300 ft.
Highest Point: 800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.73
(30 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Rivers
A classic hike in any season, but come in winter and you’ll find that the hordes of tourists, hikers, and climbers who use this trail in the summer have dwindled to just a trickle.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1650 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.69
(13 votes)
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
The hike to Deer Lake is a great day hike, or beginners overnight.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
4.3 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 850 ft.
Highest Point: 1850 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(43 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
This low-key loop in the shadow of Mount Ellinor makes for a great respite on a hot summer day or a low-country winter ramble when it's rainy.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 840 ft.
Highest Point: 6625 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.75
(4 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Ridges/passes
This moderate trail traverses a ridgeline up and down all the way to Maiden Peak.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
9.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2800 ft.
Highest Point: 5350 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.12
(17 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Fall foliage
  • Established campsites
  • Ridges/passes
Hike through a tunnel of rhododendron blooms and second-growth forest to views of the Olympic Peninsula interior and a carpet of wildflowers. Hike this route in the early summer and you may be lucky enough to see Deer Park with no cars, since the road to Deer Park often doesn't open until late in the season.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
6.5 miles of trails
Rating:
Average rating:
4.25
(4 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Coast
Visit a historic marine camping park that boasts saltwater shoreline that abuts Port Townsend Bay. Rife with military history, the trails here travel through beautiful forest and offer insight into the area's past life, including a former military cemetary.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 150 ft.
Highest Point: 850 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.67
(9 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
The South Fork Hoh Trail penetrates a wild and remote wilderness and offers hikers solitude just a short distance from the crowded main Hoh Rain Forest. The easy trail stays in the bottomland among groves of towering spruce and grassy maple glades.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
Rating:
Average rating:
2.00
(5 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Established campsites
  • Coast
The Salt Creek Recreation Area just outside of Port Angeles has several small trails in and around the camping area for folks to explore, and connects hikers to the nearby Striped Peak trail.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
12.5 miles, one-way
Gain: 796 ft.
Highest Point: 1675 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.60
(5 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Old growth
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
Formerly the Rugged Ridge Trail, the Snider-Jackson Trail is a primitive north to south traverse on the west side of Olympic National Park.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
1.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 825 ft.
Highest Point: 5020 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.71
(7 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Lakes
PJ Lake is a short but steep primitive trail to a subalpine tarn teeming with jumping trout. The lake’s beautiful color draws anglers, day hikers, and campers alike. However, the trail is so steep that the short mileage to get there is eclipsed by the vertical exertion and lingering leg pain.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Kitsap Peninsula

 
2.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 140 ft.
Highest Point: 140 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(9 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Coast
Found on the shores of Puget Sound is the marine and camping Penrose Point State Park. The park consists of 237 acres and nearly two miles of shoreline, including Mayo Cove and Carr Inlet.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
12.0 miles, one-way
Highest Point: 5000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.80
(5 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
The O’neil Pass Trail travels through the southeastern corner of Olympic National Park. It is a trail segment that sits well within the backcountry so you must hike a considerable distance to reach the start of this trail.