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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

99 Hikes

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
12.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 400 ft.
Highest Point: 500 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.33
(12 votes)
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Old growth
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
The Bogachiel River is a classic example of a lowland rainforest ecosystem, with a rough and tumble trail that extends all the way to the head of the valley. Born on lower mountains than the Hoh, Queets, and Quinault, it lacks the glacial coloration and tremendous flow associated with those valleys. What it makes up for is miles of solitude and adventure.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Olympia

 
13.8 miles, (type not yet set)
Gain: 2565 ft.
Highest Point: 1207 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
5.00
(1 vote)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Rivers
  • Fall foliage
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
The McKenny Trail is a long route in Capitol State Forest that connects the Margaret McKenny Campground and Trailhead to the east with the Fall Creel Trailhead to the west.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
10.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 300 ft.
Highest Point: 800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.20
(10 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Rivers
The hike to Halfway House follows the first five miles of the North Fork Quinault River along the same route taken by the Press Expedition of 1890. The trail passes through superb lowland rainforest before entering the canyon of the Quinault. Halfway House makes a good picnic spot for day hikers and is also a great camp site for backpackers on a longer journey.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
15.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2400 ft.
Highest Point: 3600 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.33
(6 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
Though it's hidden behind a more than 12-mile road walk or bike, the West Fork Dosewallips River trail offers tunnels of rhododendrons, a jubilant river, and solitude.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Kitsap Peninsula

 
9.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1900 ft.
Highest Point: 1639 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.50
(4 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Summits
  • Fall foliage
  • Established campsites
The Wildcat Trail on Green Mountain follows a multi-use trail on a steep, rocky ascent to the peak. Along the way, enjoy views of Hood Canal, the Olympics, and sometimes even downtown Seattle!
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
14.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3900 ft.
Highest Point: 4600 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.23
(31 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Lakes
The trail to Lena Lake is a pretty, and popular, weekend destination. But hearty hikers and backpackers who venture to Upper Lena Lake will leave the crowds behind and experience a little bit of nirvana.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
9.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2450 ft.
Highest Point: 4500 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.69
(16 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Established campsites
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
Tunnel Creek Trail has two trailheads. Nearly all hikers access the trail from the north side where for the first three miles the moderately easy grade is often within earshot of Tunnel Creek. After crossing the South Fork of Tunnel Creek, the route rises at a steeper but manageable grade past Harrison Lakes to 5050 Pass and some nearby viewpoints. The south side trailhead is on the Dosewallips Road. This segment’s notoriously steep grade to 5050 Pass means it is seldom used. Try it and you’ll find out why.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
8.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3366 ft.
Highest Point: 5381 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.20
(5 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Established campsites
  • Rivers
A well-graded trail leading from Deer Park to the Three Forks campground.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
45.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4900 ft.
Highest Point: 5700 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(4 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Summits
  • Lakes
This primitive trail spans over 20 miles through Montane and subalpine ecosystems. From the Low Divide Ranger Station to the Three Lakes campsite, the Skyline trail will take you on a steep journey past lakes and to the top of Kimta Peak.