Trails for everyone, forever

Home Go Outside Hiking Guide

Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

3903 Hikes
Palisades

Mount Rainier Area -- Chinook Pass - Hwy 410

 
15.9 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2680 ft.
Highest Point: 5300.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.16
(19 votes)
This trail has it all, from beautiful forests, beautiful waterfalls, good climbing and fun descents to technical sections with views of Mount Rainier from cliffs that will inspire you.
 
 
Snow Mountain Ranch and Cowiche Mountain

Central Washington -- Yakima

 
14.0 miles of trails
Gain: 1140 ft.
Highest Point: 2970.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.50
(8 votes)
For a flat riparian ramble or a great workout to a scenic summit, Snow Mountain Ranch is a walking wonderland just outside of Yakima.
 
 
Packwood Lake

South Cascades

 
10.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 600 ft.
Highest Point: 3200.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.88
(34 votes)
When most of Washington’s alpine lakes are still snow-covered, Packwood Lake rewards hikers with a relaxing early-season hike ideal for dusting off your boots.
 
 
Skyline Trail Loop

Mount Rainier Area -- SW - Longmire/Paradise

 
5.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1450 ft.
Highest Point: 6800.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.61
(70 votes)
The Skyline Trail is the main route for hiking out of Paradise, Mount Rainier’s south side hub and most popular destination, providing visitors a unique opportunity to experience the breathtaking beauty of Washington’s grandest mountain. Even before the historic Paradise Inn was constructed in 1916, the Paradise valley has long been one of the state’s most beloved hiking destinations because of its southern exposure, giving it a longer season than its north side counterpart, Sunrise. In peak season (July and August) your trip along the Skyline Trail will be filled with views of cascading waterfalls, mighty glaciers and subalpine meadows brimming with colorful splashes of lupines, mountain heather, scarlet paintbrush, cascade asters and bistort.
 
 
Alger Alp (South Route)

Puget Sound and Islands -- Bellingham Area

 
4.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1150 ft.
Highest Point: 1272.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.18
(11 votes)
Climb Alger Alp for a straightforward day hike or after-work ascent, with a steady climb along an access road through second-growth forest. Soak in the wildflowers and fauna along the way, and views of Skagit Valley, Blanchard Mountain and Samish Bay await you at the summit.
 
 
Gold Creek - Alaska Lake

Snoqualmie Region -- Snoqualmie Pass

 
14.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2024 ft.
Highest Point: 4624.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.79
(14 votes)
While the trail near Gold Creek Pond is a great spot for hikers of all ages, the trail back towards Alaska Lake is a more rugged experience. Starting flat, it heads into the heart of the Central Cascades on an old road for four miles, where it then crosses an impressive old avalanche path before heading straight uphill to remote Alaska Lake.
 
 
Mica Peak

Eastern Washington -- Spokane Area/Coeur d'Alene

 
45.0 miles of trails
Gain: 2000 ft.
Highest Point: 4800.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
The conservation area on the west slopes of Mica Peak afford visitors of all types a healthy workout close to the city of Spokane.
 
 
Steamboat Mountain

South Cascades -- Mount Adams Area

 
1.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 625 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(6 votes)
Enjoy great views of Mount Adams from the site of a former fire lookout tower.
 
 
Baker River

North Cascades -- Mount Baker Area

 
5.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 300 ft.
Highest Point: 900.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.86
(14 votes)
Trailhead Inaccessible: As of 10/29/21 Baker Lake Road is washed out at milepost 26, just north of Shannon Creek Campground.
Take a mellow walk on a trail that wanders among large old trees and huge mossy boulders. The trail alongside Baker River takes you on a path of gentle up and downs, splashing your way through stream crossings and past open areas filled with young alder, huckleberry and salmonberry. On a quiet spring day, your chances of seeing wildlife are excellent.
 
 
Tolmie State Park - Four Cedars Trail

Olympic Peninsula -- Olympia

 
1.98 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 225.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(6 votes)
Take a short jaunt in Tolmie State Park. Great for families or just a quick stretch of the legs.
 
 
Poo Poo Point - Chirico Trail

Issaquah Alps -- Tiger Mountain

 
3.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1760 ft.
Highest Point: 1850.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.06
(78 votes)
Hike a short but steep trail with many stone steps. Pause at a viewpoint offering a fine view of Mount Rainier, then continue on to Poo Poo Point itself, only 1.9 miles from the trailhead. Enjoy views to the northwest, and perhaps watch paragliders sailing off into the sky.
 
 
Mount Si

Snoqualmie Region -- North Bend Area

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3150 ft.
Highest Point: 3900.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.01
(248 votes)
There are many reasons – besides its proximity to Seattle – why Mount Si is the most popular hike in the state: beautiful views, wildlife (some of it not so wild), old growth forest, and a dramatic summit worthy of a more remote peak. Rising dramatically above the Snoqualmie Valley, it serves as a literal and figurative gateway to the Cascades for thousands of hikers.
 
 
Shannon Ridge

North Cascades

 
8.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2800 ft.
Highest Point: 5400.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.86
(7 votes)
Trailhead Inaccessible: As of 10/29/21 Baker Lake Road is washed out at milepost 26, just north of Shannon Creek Campground.
A welcome change of pace from some of the busier nearby hikes, this North Cascades ridge hike offers the same stunning views minus the crowds.
 
 
East Bank Baker Lake

North Cascades -- North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
9.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 500 ft.
Highest Point: 1000.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.70
(20 votes)
Trailhead Inaccessible: As of 10/29/21 Baker Lake Road is washed out at milepost 26, just north of Shannon Creek Campground.
This hike along Baker Lake is a busy, popular trail in summer. It is a nice off season walk though, and is perfect on a crisp, clear winter day. With the leaves off the trees, views that aren't possible in summer emerge; the surrounding peaks and the mossy green silhouettes of the leafless maple trees cover the hillside. A bonus any time of year are the many creeks, quaint bridges, large old-growth trees and of course, Mount Baker as the main attraction.
 
 
Silver Star Mountain via Pyramid Rock Trail

Southwest Washington -- Columbia River Gorge - WA

 
3.2 miles, one-way
Gain: 1990 ft.
Highest Point: 4390.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(1 vote)
There are many ways to the top of Silver Star Mountain but your car will thank you for choosing this one as the road is in much better shape. You are likely to see beautiful wildflower meadows on the way up to a panoramic view that includes many of the big peaks in both Washington and Oregon.
 
 
Padilla Bay

Puget Sound and Islands -- Bellingham Area

 
4.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 30 ft.
Highest Point: 30.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.23
(13 votes)
This estuary at the saltwater edge of the Skagit River delta is eight miles long and three miles across, and you can walk a portion of it. This hike can be enjoyed by almost anyone in any season. The easy flat walking make this an ideal hike for those just starting to hike, or someone recovering from injury or illness. Birders will definitely want to bring the binoculars! Before you start, be sure to check out the large tree on the road to the trailhead, there is a pair of bald eagles that sometimes hang out here.
 
 
Sword Fern Trail

Southwest Washington -- Lewis River Region

 
7.6 miles, roundtrip
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
This 2.5 mile long horseshoe trail is part of a nice 8 mile lollipop loop in the Yacolt Burn State Forest. Expect a shaded section of trail and to share the way with mountain bikers.
 
 
Beacon Rock State Park - River To Rock Trail

Southwest Washington -- Columbia River Gorge - WA

 
1.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 280.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
From the Moorage at Beacon Rock State Park this short connector trail climbs through tall Douglas-fir trees, through the site of an old homestead and Filbert Orchard, then past Ridell Lake on its way to the namesake Rock. Its a great hike for people who arrive at the park by boat or for anyone wanting to make a longer hike of the 1.0 mile Beacon Rock Trail.
 
 
Battle Ground Lake State Park - Lower Lake Trail

Southwest Washington -- Lewis River Region

 
1.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 120 ft.
Highest Point: 680.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.50
(2 votes)
Battle Ground Lake State Park is a local favorite, particularly good for families with its short loop around the lake and the playground.
 
 
Lake Little Forest

Puget Sound and Islands -- Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
Highest Point: 900.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
The Lake Little Forest was acquired by King County Parks in 2018. A small forested lake sits in the middle of this 155-acre park, and a gravel access road leads to the northern shore of the lake.
 
 
Julia's Gulch Park

Puget Sound and Islands -- Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
0.9 miles of trails
Gain: 150 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
Named for a Puyallup-Klickitat tribal member who lived nearby, this park is a strip of green forest that sits between a residential neighborhood and an industrial area below.
 
 
Independence Pass Loop

South Cascades -- Mount St. Helens

 
6.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1665 ft.
Highest Point: 4700.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(5 votes)
The Independence Pass trail is impassable past the first 1.5 miles due to significant washouts and cannot currently be connected with the Boundary Trail to complete this loop.
 
 
Silver Star Mountain - Ed's Trail

Southwest Washington -- Lewis River Region

 
5.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1240 ft.
Highest Point: 4390.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.40
(15 votes)
There are two routes up the north side of Silver Star Mountain that in good conditions can be combined to form a sort of loop. Along the way, hikers will be delighted with a diverse array of wildflowers, a natural arch, volcanic views and fine hiking.
 
 
Norway Pass

South Cascades -- Mount St. Helens

 
4.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 860 ft.
Highest Point: 4500.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.25
(16 votes)
Witness the destructive force and the restorative power of nature on this hike in the blast zone of Mount St. Helens’ 1980 eruption. The rocky ash and treeless areas are testaments to the devastation caused by the explosion, while wildflowers and shrubs signal the return of vegetation to the denuded landscape.
 
 
Berthusen Park

Puget Sound and Islands -- Bellingham Area

 
2.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 20 ft.
Highest Point: 111.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
Berthusen Park offers up plenty of great opportunities to get outdoors and explore. This beautiful park, the site of a homestead from the late 1800s, has antique farm machinery, a historical cabin, a big red barn and a great playground with a wonderful swing set for kids.
 
 
Mount Catherine

Snoqualmie Region -- Snoqualmie Pass

 
3.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1330 ft.
Highest Point: 5052.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.14
(43 votes)
Where can you find unobstructed views of Mount Rainier and the mountains of Snoqualmie Pass, see rare butterfly species, and go berry-picking, all in return for a modest 1330-foot elevation gain? Mount Catherine, of course! This off-the-beaten-path hike to the summit of a wintertime ski destination is one of the most rewarding climbs along the southern wall of Snoqualmie Pass.
 
 
Deep Creek

Mount Rainier Area -- Chinook Pass - Hwy 410

 
4.0 miles, one-way
Gain: 3000 ft.
Highest Point: 5850.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.33
(6 votes)
Start at the junction with the White River Trail 1199 and climb through old growth timber. At mile .5 find a spur trail to left with a view of the White River Valley. Come to another scenic view of Mt. Rainier and the valley at mile 3.6. The junction with Noble Knob Trail 1184 is just ahead at mile 4.
 
 
Vesper Peak

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4000 ft.
Highest Point: 6214.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.54
(28 votes)
Vesper Peak is definitely not for the novice hiker, but for those thirsting for one step beyond hiking into backcountry adventure, it's a good leaping off point. The smooth, low angle granite of Vesper's upper reaches make for relatively easy off-trail travel and beginning routefinding.
 
 
Mount Muller

Olympic Peninsula -- Northern Coast

 
12.7 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3350 ft.
Highest Point: 3748.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.63
(19 votes)
Mount Muller offers breathtaking views from a breathtaking trail -- it's a steep climb, but those who make it to the lofty ridgeline are rewarded with a panorama that includes the Strait of Juan de Fuca, massive Mount Olympus, and sapphire, sparkling Lake Crescent.
 
 
Beckler Peak

Central Cascades -- Stevens Pass - West

 
7.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2240 ft.
Highest Point: 5026.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.52
(71 votes)
Hike a re-built trail adjacent to the Wild Sky Wilderness. The Beckler Peak trail opened in September of 2011, and with it, the Jennifer Dunn trailhead. The trail takes you through an old-growth forest to summit views of Glacier Peak, Baring, Index, the Monte Cristo Range, and Evergreen Mountain. It's easy to get to and provides great rewards for your effort. The trail has a gentle grade, it is well built, and suitable for kids. Be sure to take water with you, because there is no reliable water along the trail.