Trails for everyone, forever

Home Our Work About Us Accomplishments Where We Worked 2021
Where We Worked 2021 Here's where WTA's volunteer and paid trail maintenance crews worked in 2021 improving Washington's trail network.

Where WTA Worked in 2021

As always, WTA did a lot of work this year. How much is a lot? More than 3,000 individual volunteers contributed 128,000+ trail maintenance hours on more than 1,500 work parties in 304 locations statewide! Whew. Youth volunteers were a significant part of this work. Our youth trail events welcomed 508 individual youth, who did 8,040 hours of volunteer work this year.

Click around on this map to find a trail near you where you can go see some of our recent trail work in person. Or read our 2021 accomplishments for more about what we did as an organization.

  • Antoine Peak's Canfield Gulch is the east side access to this 1,296 acre conservation area.
    47.7292211112 -117.143032551
    Antoine Peak's Canfield Gulch is the east side access to this 1,296 acre conservation area.
  • With a trailhead so easily accessible, there's no excuse not to visit Snoquera Falls. Best in early spring, this lush, forested trail features a pretty fantail cascade plunging down a sheer, rocky wall.
    47.0328 -121.55785
    With a trailhead so easily accessible, there's no excuse not to visit Snoquera Falls. Best in early spring, this lush, forested trail features a pretty fantail cascade plunging down a sheer, rocky wall.
  • A relatively short and easy hike within a stone’s throw of Seattle, Snow Lake delivers splendorous alpine scenery – crystal clear waters, towering peaks – at a mere pittance of sweat and toil. Just don’t expect to have the trail to yourself – Snow Lake is Washington's most heavily-used trail in a wilderness area!
    47.4454166667 -121.423016667
    A relatively short and easy hike within a stone’s throw of Seattle, Snow Lake delivers splendorous alpine scenery – crystal clear waters, towering peaks – at a mere pittance of sweat and toil. Just don’t expect to have the trail to yourself – Snow Lake is Washington's most heavily-used trail in a wilderness area!
  • The Skyline Divide is a 6000-foot-high ridgeline extension of Mount Baker that transforms itself into a summertime paradise of unrivaled mountain views and unending wildflower fields, a trail that deposits you just 3.5 miles from the summit itself.
    48.88095 -121.864616667
    The Skyline Divide is a 6000-foot-high ridgeline extension of Mount Baker that transforms itself into a summertime paradise of unrivaled mountain views and unending wildflower fields, a trail that deposits you just 3.5 miles from the summit itself.
  • A hidden gem revealed! The South Fork Cascade Trail was in the Mineral Park Fire of 2003, but recent efforts by WTA crews and other volunteer organizations have helped reopen a section of it, and continue to repair it.
    48.465310806 -121.156209469
    A hidden gem revealed! The South Fork Cascade Trail was in the Mineral Park Fire of 2003, but recent efforts by WTA crews and other volunteer organizations have helped reopen a section of it, and continue to repair it.
  • A short connector trail to the Snipes Mountain trail and other adventures on the southern flanks of Mount Adams.
    46.1028833333 -121.434616667
    A short connector trail to the Snipes Mountain trail and other adventures on the southern flanks of Mount Adams.
  • With more than 600 acres of rolling fields, pine-forested buttes and wetlands, the Slavin Conservation Area provides plenty of room to stretch legs all year-round.
    47.5325917 -117.4215244
    With more than 600 acres of rolling fields, pine-forested buttes and wetlands, the Slavin Conservation Area provides plenty of room to stretch legs all year-round.
  • The Six Ridge Trail is a rugged route that traverses the South Fork to the North Fork of the Skokomish River. It is known for its solitude, meadows and grand mountain vistas, but it comes at a price -- a steep, long trail to these destinations.
    47.4794 -123.4521
    The Six Ridge Trail is a rugged route that traverses the South Fork to the North Fork of the Skokomish River. It is known for its solitude, meadows and grand mountain vistas, but it comes at a price -- a steep, long trail to these destinations.
  • Former lookout sites are ideal for views, and Strawberry Mountain is right up there with the best of them. See peaks in two states, the blast zone of an active volcano, and a few sapphire lakes set into the dramatic landscape. That is, of course, if you can bear the drive to get there.
    46.3134983955 -122.036447226
    Former lookout sites are ideal for views, and Strawberry Mountain is right up there with the best of them. See peaks in two states, the blast zone of an active volcano, and a few sapphire lakes set into the dramatic landscape. That is, of course, if you can bear the drive to get there.
  • Known as the South Puyallup Trail, this access point to the Wonderland Trail is a connector 1.7 miles long that wends its way through a mature forest with trees ranging between 100 to 1000 years old. The variety of ecosystems make this hike an alluring one: visitors start in the lower elevations, surrounded by western redcedar, Douglas fir, yew and western hemlock. But as you climb, you'll see Pacific silver fir, western white pine, noble fir, and the rare Alaska yellow cedar.
    46.8065414181 -121.890895791
    Known as the South Puyallup Trail, this access point to the Wonderland Trail is a connector 1.7 miles long that wends its way through a mature forest with trees ranging between 100 to 1000 years old. The variety of ecosystems make this hike an alluring one: visitors start in the lower elevations, surrounded by western redcedar, Douglas fir, yew and western hemlock. But as you climb, you'll see Pacific silver fir, western white pine, noble fir, and the rare Alaska yellow cedar.
  • Visit a multi-use trail to a summit that boasts coastal scenery, forests, rocky bluffs, tidepools, and a hearty climb to a 1,166-foot viewpoint over the Strait of Juan de Fuca
    48.1621833333 -123.698566667
    Visit a multi-use trail to a summit that boasts coastal scenery, forests, rocky bluffs, tidepools, and a hearty climb to a 1,166-foot viewpoint over the Strait of Juan de Fuca
  • Tucked away atop Chuckanut Mountain is shallow Lost Lake. The south trail to the lake leads through a recovering forest of bigleaf maple, alder, Douglas fir, and western hemlock, meandering 4.5 miles to a riparian hideout, providing waterfalls, old growth, fall color, and year-round hiking to those who make the journey.
    48.6467538 -122.4625765
    Tucked away atop Chuckanut Mountain is shallow Lost Lake. The south trail to the lake leads through a recovering forest of bigleaf maple, alder, Douglas fir, and western hemlock, meandering 4.5 miles to a riparian hideout, providing waterfalls, old growth, fall color, and year-round hiking to those who make the journey.
  • Take a stroll through 350 acres of undisturbed old-growth forest and thriving wetland ecosystem at the Stimpson Family Nature Reserve, a quiet place where hikers can experience the intricate grandeur of nature. Interpretive signs encourage adults and children to discover the nature of the reserve.
    48.7319644872 -122.376880646
    Take a stroll through 350 acres of undisturbed old-growth forest and thriving wetland ecosystem at the Stimpson Family Nature Reserve, a quiet place where hikers can experience the intricate grandeur of nature. Interpretive signs encourage adults and children to discover the nature of the reserve.
  • Spectacle Lake is truly worthy of the name - it's quite a sight to see. Nestled at the base of Chikamin Ridge and just a short jaunt from the Pacific Crest Trail, this lake is one of the true gems of Snoqualmie Pass.
    47.4336612787 -121.188812256
    Spectacle Lake is truly worthy of the name - it's quite a sight to see. Nestled at the base of Chikamin Ridge and just a short jaunt from the Pacific Crest Trail, this lake is one of the true gems of Snoqualmie Pass.
  • Part of the scenic Pacific Northwest Trail, rugged 8-mile Swift Creek Trail accesses the Mount Baker Wilderness.
    48.7648349345 -121.669871807
    Part of the scenic Pacific Northwest Trail, rugged 8-mile Swift Creek Trail accesses the Mount Baker Wilderness.
  • From towering old-growth giants to placid lakes with craggy mountain views, this hike has everything you want in a trail. Put this one on your list of places to explore along Highway 2.
    47.7078 -121.1567
    From towering old-growth giants to placid lakes with craggy mountain views, this hike has everything you want in a trail. Put this one on your list of places to explore along Highway 2.
  • Do a thru-hike on the main Tiger Mountain Trail, also known as the TMT. Arrange a car shuttle and start at the southern end. Hike north more than fifteen miles over varied terrain and through different types of forest vegetation. Pass a large glacial erratic boulder, and visit some of the most remote places in the Tigers.
    47.44255 -121.9776
    Do a thru-hike on the main Tiger Mountain Trail, also known as the TMT. Arrange a car shuttle and start at the southern end. Hike north more than fifteen miles over varied terrain and through different types of forest vegetation. Pass a large glacial erratic boulder, and visit some of the most remote places in the Tigers.
  • A scramble and climbing route to the summit of a mountain in the Olympic range. Climbing gear and expertise required.
    47.5997 -123.1512
    A scramble and climbing route to the summit of a mountain in the Olympic range. Climbing gear and expertise required.
  • If you're looking for the best workout in the park, you'd be hard-pressed to find something better than this, the longest trail. Circumnavigate the park's namesake peak by following trail 130 "round-the-mountain" for nearly 12 miles of forested trail punctuated by the occasional open meadow, or opt to turn around at any time for a shorter stroll.
    47.9048357587 -117.10267067
    If you're looking for the best workout in the park, you'd be hard-pressed to find something better than this, the longest trail. Circumnavigate the park's namesake peak by following trail 130 "round-the-mountain" for nearly 12 miles of forested trail punctuated by the occasional open meadow, or opt to turn around at any time for a shorter stroll.
  • This trail climbs from the trailhead on Forest Road 5401 through an old-growth forest to views of the many mountains of the South Cascades from Observation Peak.
    45.8816884 -121.9835786
    This trail climbs from the trailhead on Forest Road 5401 through an old-growth forest to views of the many mountains of the South Cascades from Observation Peak.
  • Tunnel Creek Trail has two trailheads. Nearly all hikers access the trail from the north side where for the first three miles the moderately easy grade is often within earshot of Tunnel Creek. After crossing the South Fork of Tunnel Creek, the route rises at a steeper but manageable grade past Harrison Lakes to 5050 Pass and some nearby viewpoints. The south side trailhead is on the Dosewallips Road. This segment’s notoriously steep grade to 5050 Pass means it is seldom used. Try it and you’ll find out why.
    47.7815333333 -123.052116667
    Tunnel Creek Trail has two trailheads. Nearly all hikers access the trail from the north side where for the first three miles the moderately easy grade is often within earshot of Tunnel Creek. After crossing the South Fork of Tunnel Creek, the route rises at a steeper but manageable grade past Harrison Lakes to 5050 Pass and some nearby viewpoints. The south side trailhead is on the Dosewallips Road. This segment’s notoriously steep grade to 5050 Pass means it is seldom used. Try it and you’ll find out why.
  • Twisp Pass is a stunner in summer and autumn. Though it is a bit of a drive to get there from almost anywhere in the state, it's well worth it!
    48.4585666667 -120.56755
    Twisp Pass is a stunner in summer and autumn. Though it is a bit of a drive to get there from almost anywhere in the state, it's well worth it!
  • A long dirt road provides access to the central trailhead for the William O. Douglas Wilderness Area. The popular, easy forest hike to the Twin Sisters Lakes is a prelude to miles of exploration possible on trails and cross-country through open forest, past meadows, ponds, and lakes.
    46.75205 -121.36155
    A long dirt road provides access to the central trailhead for the William O. Douglas Wilderness Area. The popular, easy forest hike to the Twin Sisters Lakes is a prelude to miles of exploration possible on trails and cross-country through open forest, past meadows, ponds, and lakes.
  • Although best known for its namesake mine and the nearby aircraft wreckage, the Tubal Cain trail also offers a pleasant and scenic route to Marmot Pass, a gateway to further wanderings.
    47.8862166667 -123.091616667
    Although best known for its namesake mine and the nearby aircraft wreckage, the Tubal Cain trail also offers a pleasant and scenic route to Marmot Pass, a gateway to further wanderings.
  • The Upper South Fork Skokomish River to Sundown Pass can be considered a tale of two trails. The first half stays low in lush valley bottom on brushy but obvious tread, while the second half makes up for lost time, ascending steeply through subalpine forest between wet meadows on faint and broken tread. The scenery improves with every step near the top, and reaching Lake Sundown is a welcome reward after all the toil.
    47.479417 -123.452083
    The Upper South Fork Skokomish River to Sundown Pass can be considered a tale of two trails. The first half stays low in lush valley bottom on brushy but obvious tread, while the second half makes up for lost time, ascending steeply through subalpine forest between wet meadows on faint and broken tread. The scenery improves with every step near the top, and reaching Lake Sundown is a welcome reward after all the toil.
  • An accessible hike for seasoned veterans and neophytes alike, Wallace Falls provides visitors with breathtaking views of the Wallace River and the surrounding falls on a relatively low difficulty, scenic 5.6 mile round-trip. Although well attended and often busy, the trail stands as a true showcase of the diversity and majestic beauty that the Central Cascades can offer to hikers who journey into the heart of this sublime mountain range.
    47.8669166667 -121.67805
    An accessible hike for seasoned veterans and neophytes alike, Wallace Falls provides visitors with breathtaking views of the Wallace River and the surrounding falls on a relatively low difficulty, scenic 5.6 mile round-trip. Although well attended and often busy, the trail stands as a true showcase of the diversity and majestic beauty that the Central Cascades can offer to hikers who journey into the heart of this sublime mountain range.
  • The trail to Lena Lake is a pretty, and popular, weekend destination. But hearty hikers and backpackers who venture to Upper Lena Lake will leave the crowds behind and experience a little bit of nirvana.
    47.6008706 -123.1455854
    The trail to Lena Lake is a pretty, and popular, weekend destination. But hearty hikers and backpackers who venture to Upper Lena Lake will leave the crowds behind and experience a little bit of nirvana.
  • To see beautiful Williams Lake, set in a meadow basin with pockets of larch trees, a hiker must earn it. The shallow gradient trail takes 7 miles to gain 3600 feet and is mostly on a fire-scorched, sun-baked south facing slope where the sparse shade offers a welcome respite from the heat.
    48.3972116501 -120.467190742
    To see beautiful Williams Lake, set in a meadow basin with pockets of larch trees, a hiker must earn it. The shallow gradient trail takes 7 miles to gain 3600 feet and is mostly on a fire-scorched, sun-baked south facing slope where the sparse shade offers a welcome respite from the heat.
  • In logging's heyday, whistle punks were men tasked with operating the signal that let other loggers know a log had been hooked up and was ready to be moved. Using interpretive signage, this trail illustrates what was like to be on a logging show, from the crew, to the cook, to camp.
    45.810083 -121.943583
    In logging's heyday, whistle punks were men tasked with operating the signal that let other loggers know a log had been hooked up and was ready to be moved. Using interpretive signage, this trail illustrates what was like to be on a logging show, from the crew, to the cook, to camp.
  • A deep-forest experience without the drive. Whipple Creek Park is a 300-acre green oasis in the midst of farmlands to the west of the Clark County Fairgrounds. This hike loops through colossal Douglas fir trees and waist-high sword ferns to provide a primordial experience where you are dwarfed by nature. There is a small meadow for a picnic and the remnants of a grist mill to explore. This hike is a great way to escape urban life and be immersed in a peaceful forest environment.
    45.745054 -122.695021
    A deep-forest experience without the drive. Whipple Creek Park is a 300-acre green oasis in the midst of farmlands to the west of the Clark County Fairgrounds. This hike loops through colossal Douglas fir trees and waist-high sword ferns to provide a primordial experience where you are dwarfed by nature. There is a small meadow for a picnic and the remnants of a grist mill to explore. This hike is a great way to escape urban life and be immersed in a peaceful forest environment.
  • Descend into the heart of the Wenaha-Tucannon Wilderness from the historic Godman Guard Station, crossing through the Rainbow Creek Research Natural Area.
    46.09978088 -117.786784172
    Descend into the heart of the Wenaha-Tucannon Wilderness from the historic Godman Guard Station, crossing through the Rainbow Creek Research Natural Area.
  • Hike to a small lava dome with an associated summit crater in southern Washington.
    45.87845 -122.082933333
    Hike to a small lava dome with an associated summit crater in southern Washington.
  • The trail around Wynoochee Lake is a pleasant stroll through second growth forest with a lush understory. As with many “lakeshore” trails, the trail is not actually near the lakeshore. While the lake is generally out of sight, it does allow the possibility of a hike/canoe biathlon, if you can find a partner with a canoe. Wynoochee Lake is smaller and calmer than some of the lakes in Washington, making this a nice option.
    47.4084195 -123.5852133
    The trail around Wynoochee Lake is a pleasant stroll through second growth forest with a lush understory. As with many “lakeshore” trails, the trail is not actually near the lakeshore. While the lake is generally out of sight, it does allow the possibility of a hike/canoe biathlon, if you can find a partner with a canoe. Wynoochee Lake is smaller and calmer than some of the lakes in Washington, making this a nice option.
  • With five miles of shoreline in South Puget Sound, the Woodard Bay Conservation Area includes forests, wetlands of freshwater, as well as historic and cultural resources that are a valuable diversion in the area.
    47.1268525411 -122.853779001
    With five miles of shoreline in South Puget Sound, the Woodard Bay Conservation Area includes forests, wetlands of freshwater, as well as historic and cultural resources that are a valuable diversion in the area.
  • Find supreme wildflower gardens and a high-country plateau speckled with shimmering tarns-but that's not all. Spectacular alpine vistas abound too-of Baker, Shuksan, and all those rugged and craggy peaks straddling the 49th parallel. Yellow Aster Butte may be a misnomer (those yellow-petaled delights are actually daisies), but you definitely don't want to miss hiking here.
    48.9435166667 -121.66245
    Find supreme wildflower gardens and a high-country plateau speckled with shimmering tarns-but that's not all. Spectacular alpine vistas abound too-of Baker, Shuksan, and all those rugged and craggy peaks straddling the 49th parallel. Yellow Aster Butte may be a misnomer (those yellow-petaled delights are actually daisies), but you definitely don't want to miss hiking here.
  • This little-known gem of a hike on the Washington side of the Columbia River Gorge offers spectacular views of the Columbia River, amazing spring wildflowers and an old garry oak forest of gnarled old trees. This stunning preserve is owned by the Friends of the Columbia Gorge and tops out in an old cherry orchard with a few surviving trees.
    45.6810189 -121.2459862
    This little-known gem of a hike on the Washington side of the Columbia River Gorge offers spectacular views of the Columbia River, amazing spring wildflowers and an old garry oak forest of gnarled old trees. This stunning preserve is owned by the Friends of the Columbia Gorge and tops out in an old cherry orchard with a few surviving trees.
  • Take a hike on the edge of Spokane Valley with commanding views of Spokane Valley and the Palouse. On the way, you'll see many plant species typical of western slopes of Cascades, a seasonal stream, and amazing variety of wildflowers through from late March through mid-July.
    47.6052806 -117.2808444
    Take a hike on the edge of Spokane Valley with commanding views of Spokane Valley and the Palouse. On the way, you'll see many plant species typical of western slopes of Cascades, a seasonal stream, and amazing variety of wildflowers through from late March through mid-July.
  • Named for its proximity to Hauser Lake, this hike doesn't actually offer any lake access or views. Instead, it's a good place to stretch one's legs and perhaps see some wildlife.
    47.7967894865 -117.052577734
    Named for its proximity to Hauser Lake, this hike doesn't actually offer any lake access or views. Instead, it's a good place to stretch one's legs and perhaps see some wildlife.
  • A gentle meandering barrier-free path leads through a mature cottonwood forest just west of Vancouver Lake. Although you can't see the lake through all the trees, there are other sights and sounds to enjoy along this route. Most notably the vibrant greens of the understory in spring, beautiful fall yellows and quite a few species of birds nearly all year.
    45.6789627127 -122.742892206
    A gentle meandering barrier-free path leads through a mature cottonwood forest just west of Vancouver Lake. Although you can't see the lake through all the trees, there are other sights and sounds to enjoy along this route. Most notably the vibrant greens of the understory in spring, beautiful fall yellows and quite a few species of birds nearly all year.
  • The Three Lakes Trail is a tour of some of Olympic's finest old growth forests, and is the traditional start of the much longer Queets-Quinault Skyline route. Starting in lowland rainforest, the trail works its way through exemplary stands of montane and then subalpine forests before finally breaking out into meadows dotted with tiny lakes. This is a truly wild and remote corner of the Olympics that leaves a lasting impression on the lucky hiker who experiences its beauty.
    47.567617 -123.6553
    The Three Lakes Trail is a tour of some of Olympic's finest old growth forests, and is the traditional start of the much longer Queets-Quinault Skyline route. Starting in lowland rainforest, the trail works its way through exemplary stands of montane and then subalpine forests before finally breaking out into meadows dotted with tiny lakes. This is a truly wild and remote corner of the Olympics that leaves a lasting impression on the lucky hiker who experiences its beauty.
  • Follow this wide path as it winds through tall, ivy-covered Douglas firs. Although it’s in the middle of the city, this trail around a developing park provides a great way to enjoy the outdoors.
    45.665469 -122.592302
    Follow this wide path as it winds through tall, ivy-covered Douglas firs. Although it’s in the middle of the city, this trail around a developing park provides a great way to enjoy the outdoors.
  • Many hikers only see the first couple miles of this trail, since Lily Lake is a popular location for families. But the Clear Fork Trail is many miles long, and offers fantastic adventure past the small lake.
    46.6555 -121.4862
    Many hikers only see the first couple miles of this trail, since Lily Lake is a popular location for families. But the Clear Fork Trail is many miles long, and offers fantastic adventure past the small lake.
  • From dense forest to subalpine views, trail 140 extends from the base of the mountain all the way to the summit of the State Park's namesake peak.
    47.9209438364 -117.114429474
    From dense forest to subalpine views, trail 140 extends from the base of the mountain all the way to the summit of the State Park's namesake peak.
  • China Lake is a small forest escape with a trail that takes you around a quiet lake on a green nature walk. Perfect on a sunny day for a stroll and a picnic or for hiding from the rain under a tree canopy, this trail is just a step away from the bustle of city life nearby.
    47.2430486714 -122.510293722
    China Lake is a small forest escape with a trail that takes you around a quiet lake on a green nature walk. Perfect on a sunny day for a stroll and a picnic or for hiding from the rain under a tree canopy, this trail is just a step away from the bustle of city life nearby.
  • Nick’s Lagoon is a small greenspace managed by Kitsap County Parks. The lagoon sits in the nook of Seabeck Bay.
    47.6392717228 -122.841546535
    Nick’s Lagoon is a small greenspace managed by Kitsap County Parks. The lagoon sits in the nook of Seabeck Bay.
  • If the tide is high, or you just want to see a different side of the Olympic Peninsula while you're visiting the coast, cross Highway 101 from the Kalaloch campground and take a peek into the deep Olympic forest.
    47.6092790622 -124.372518416
    If the tide is high, or you just want to see a different side of the Olympic Peninsula while you're visiting the coast, cross Highway 101 from the Kalaloch campground and take a peek into the deep Olympic forest.
  • The Little Lake Forest was acquired by King County Parks in 2018. A small forested lake sits in the middle of this 155-acre park, and a gravel access road leads to the northern shore of the lake.
    47.2102400274 -121.952619553
    The Little Lake Forest was acquired by King County Parks in 2018. A small forested lake sits in the middle of this 155-acre park, and a gravel access road leads to the northern shore of the lake.
  • This local park features two trails that take visitors out-and-back through the forest.
    47.516398 -122.51739
    This local park features two trails that take visitors out-and-back through the forest.
  • The curiously-named Lake 22 is the center of an oasis of alpine wetland nestled on the northern shoulder of Mount Pilchuck. The hike to the lake combines the best of mountain rainforests, old-growth, wetlands, and mountain views, yet it is readily accessible. In winter the route lends itself to snowshoeing.
    48.0769666667 -121.7457
    The curiously-named Lake 22 is the center of an oasis of alpine wetland nestled on the northern shoulder of Mount Pilchuck. The hike to the lake combines the best of mountain rainforests, old-growth, wetlands, and mountain views, yet it is readily accessible. In winter the route lends itself to snowshoeing.
  • This is an easy loop trail, wandering nearly one mile through a forest of bigleaf maple and cedars on the shores of Carr Inlet in Gig Harbor. With less than fifty feet of elevation gain and plenty of picnic tables, it makes the perfect destination for families with small children.
    47.3085118 -122.6807268
    This is an easy loop trail, wandering nearly one mile through a forest of bigleaf maple and cedars on the shores of Carr Inlet in Gig Harbor. With less than fifty feet of elevation gain and plenty of picnic tables, it makes the perfect destination for families with small children.
  • The trail winds its way above the Suiattle River through old-growth forest and some mature forest recovering from an old burn from the 1920’s. The vegetation in the upper Suiattle watershed includes a wonderful mixture of west-of-the-crest/east-of-the-crest species.
    48.2480576178 -121.192086563
    The trail winds its way above the Suiattle River through old-growth forest and some mature forest recovering from an old burn from the 1920’s. The vegetation in the upper Suiattle watershed includes a wonderful mixture of west-of-the-crest/east-of-the-crest species.
  • This short hike offers something to please the geology buff and the shutterbug alike.
    47.5720091785 -117.289738655
    This short hike offers something to please the geology buff and the shutterbug alike.
  • Visit a wildlife-filled greenspace with a burgeoning trail system in West Seattle.
    47.5578988725 -122.357006685
    Visit a wildlife-filled greenspace with a burgeoning trail system in West Seattle.
  • Hike a loop around Anti-Aircraft Peak in the Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park. Hike past sites associated with coal and clay mining, and a former 1950s-era anti-aircraft missile installation. Enjoy good forest trails, some seasonal wildflowers, and a million-dollar view.
    47.534198291 -122.113773166
    Hike a loop around Anti-Aircraft Peak in the Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park. Hike past sites associated with coal and clay mining, and a former 1950s-era anti-aircraft missile installation. Enjoy good forest trails, some seasonal wildflowers, and a million-dollar view.
  • The trail to Appleton Pass is only 7.7 miles, but it hikes longer. The route offers some rewarding diversions along the way, but much of the payoff is in the last 1.5 miles with sweeping views as one ascends the meadows and traverses the switchbacks to Appleton Pass. Plan for an early start to your day in order to enjoy lunch, and perhaps even a restorative nap, at Appleton Pass.
    47.9868333333 -123.651916667
    The trail to Appleton Pass is only 7.7 miles, but it hikes longer. The route offers some rewarding diversions along the way, but much of the payoff is in the last 1.5 miles with sweeping views as one ascends the meadows and traverses the switchbacks to Appleton Pass. Plan for an early start to your day in order to enjoy lunch, and perhaps even a restorative nap, at Appleton Pass.
  • This trail features plenty of variety, with destinations spaced perfectly for families or first-time backpackers. Beautiful hemlock forest, meadows dotted with wildflowers, gleaming lakes, mountain views, juicy berries and excellent camping are all available. Wait until later in the hiking season though, as this area is known for its bugs.
    48.6746666667 -121.601666667
    This trail features plenty of variety, with destinations spaced perfectly for families or first-time backpackers. Beautiful hemlock forest, meadows dotted with wildflowers, gleaming lakes, mountain views, juicy berries and excellent camping are all available. Wait until later in the hiking season though, as this area is known for its bugs.
  • Acquired in four phases through Spokane County’s Conservation Futures Program, with additional funding secured through the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office, the Antoine Peak Conservation Area offers fantastic views overlooking Liberty Lake, the Spokane Valley, and north to Mount Spokane and the Selkirk Range.
    47.7219607128 -117.195410728
    Acquired in four phases through Spokane County’s Conservation Futures Program, with additional funding secured through the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office, the Antoine Peak Conservation Area offers fantastic views overlooking Liberty Lake, the Spokane Valley, and north to Mount Spokane and the Selkirk Range.
  • Waterfalls, wildflowers, sheltering forests, mountain views and an alpine lake are offered on this well-maintained trail. At the lake, enjoy the sights and relax for a while. If you backpacked in, stay at the campsites for a sunrise and sunset on the lake.
    47.3927574554 -121.474073344
    Waterfalls, wildflowers, sheltering forests, mountain views and an alpine lake are offered on this well-maintained trail. At the lake, enjoy the sights and relax for a while. If you backpacked in, stay at the campsites for a sunrise and sunset on the lake.
  • Barclay Lake offers something for almost everyone: a well-maintained trail that is accessible to beginners and children, stunning mountain views, mycology, camping, a serene alpine lake, and a staging area for challenging adventures in the 106,000-acre Wild Sky Wilderness. Keep your camera charged, as this popular pathway in the shadow of Baring Mountain offers many photo opportunities.
    47.7922847754 -121.459243298
    Barclay Lake offers something for almost everyone: a well-maintained trail that is accessible to beginners and children, stunning mountain views, mycology, camping, a serene alpine lake, and a staging area for challenging adventures in the 106,000-acre Wild Sky Wilderness. Keep your camera charged, as this popular pathway in the shadow of Baring Mountain offers many photo opportunities.
  • Hug the shoreline for a lovely out-and-back trek along the undeveloped side of Bead Lake.
    48.2896558 -117.1075482
    Hug the shoreline for a lovely out-and-back trek along the undeveloped side of Bead Lake.
  • This hike along Baker Lake is a busy, popular trail in summer. It is a nice off season walk though, and is perfect on a crisp, clear winter day. With the leaves off the trees, views that aren't possible in summer emerge; the surrounding peaks and the mossy green silhouettes of the leafless maple trees cover the hillside. A bonus any time of year are the many creeks, quaint bridges, large old-growth trees and of course, Mount Baker as the main attraction.
    48.75065 -121.556016667
    This hike along Baker Lake is a busy, popular trail in summer. It is a nice off season walk though, and is perfect on a crisp, clear winter day. With the leaves off the trees, views that aren't possible in summer emerge; the surrounding peaks and the mossy green silhouettes of the leafless maple trees cover the hillside. A bonus any time of year are the many creeks, quaint bridges, large old-growth trees and of course, Mount Baker as the main attraction.
  • Battle Ground Lake State Park is a local favorite, particularly good for families with its short loop around the lake and the playground.
    45.8029814413 -122.491356899
    Battle Ground Lake State Park is a local favorite, particularly good for families with its short loop around the lake and the playground.
  • This short hike offers access to a stunning Goat Rocks summit, but you'll work for it. With more than 1000 feet of elevation gain in the last 0.9 mile push to the top, you'll be gasping for breath...and that's before the view renders you speechless.
    46.5381018701 -121.316213754
    This short hike offers access to a stunning Goat Rocks summit, but you'll work for it. With more than 1000 feet of elevation gain in the last 0.9 mile push to the top, you'll be gasping for breath...and that's before the view renders you speechless.
  • Bring the family for this easy hike at Heather Meadows. Two sparkling alpine lakes, an abundance of wildflowers, an impressive mountainous backdrop and a year-round snowfield make this a hike that will please everybody. What's more, this trail gets a fraction of the foot traffic that the trails at Artist Point get in late summer.
    48.8631799 -121.6793076
    Bring the family for this easy hike at Heather Meadows. Two sparkling alpine lakes, an abundance of wildflowers, an impressive mountainous backdrop and a year-round snowfield make this a hike that will please everybody. What's more, this trail gets a fraction of the foot traffic that the trails at Artist Point get in late summer.
  • Hike a trail built mostly of boardwalk planking through peaty bogs beside three quiet little lakes. Established campsites with fire pits, benches and tent platforms await a weekend of camping with the kids. This trail also makes a pleasant weekday hike for those with creaky knees, as it is not difficult. As you hike, enjoy the many plants and animals that make the lowland bog environment home.
    48.0476666667 -121.714183333
    Hike a trail built mostly of boardwalk planking through peaty bogs beside three quiet little lakes. Established campsites with fire pits, benches and tent platforms await a weekend of camping with the kids. This trail also makes a pleasant weekday hike for those with creaky knees, as it is not difficult. As you hike, enjoy the many plants and animals that make the lowland bog environment home.
  • From Barlow Point’s rocky promontory, hikers can take in views of Mount Dickerman, Big Four, and Stillaguamish Peak.
    48.0304666667 -121.442933333
    From Barlow Point’s rocky promontory, hikers can take in views of Mount Dickerman, Big Four, and Stillaguamish Peak.
  • The Basin Lake Trail is located just east of the Crystal Mountain Ski Resort in the Norse Peak Wilderness. This is a little-used trail, which traverses some steep sections with eroding gullies where hikers may get queasy depending on their comfort level with exposure.
    46.9368725565 -121.47424221
    The Basin Lake Trail is located just east of the Crystal Mountain Ski Resort in the Norse Peak Wilderness. This is a little-used trail, which traverses some steep sections with eroding gullies where hikers may get queasy depending on their comfort level with exposure.
  • Take a mellow walk on a trail that wanders among large old trees and huge mossy boulders. The trail alongside Baker River takes you on a path of gentle up and downs, splashing your way through stream crossings and past open areas filled with young alder, huckleberry and salmonberry. On a quiet spring day, your chances of seeing wildlife are excellent.
    48.75065 -121.556016667
    Take a mellow walk on a trail that wanders among large old trees and huge mossy boulders. The trail alongside Baker River takes you on a path of gentle up and downs, splashing your way through stream crossings and past open areas filled with young alder, huckleberry and salmonberry. On a quiet spring day, your chances of seeing wildlife are excellent.
  • Visit one of the most striking lakes in the Henry M. Jackson wilderness. The vibrant blue of the glacier-fed lake provides the perfect rest stop for hikers who have braved the thirty-odd, steep switchbacks that lead to the lake.
    47.9153666667 -121.312366667
    Visit one of the most striking lakes in the Henry M. Jackson wilderness. The vibrant blue of the glacier-fed lake provides the perfect rest stop for hikers who have braved the thirty-odd, steep switchbacks that lead to the lake.
  • This forested trail to a small, secluded lake uniquely set on a ridge with a few campsites provides an easy day hike or backpack trip. Unfortunately, Purcell Creek washed out the access road 1.3 miles before the trailhead, making it a bit more difficult for children.
    46.6532166667 -121.570483333
    This forested trail to a small, secluded lake uniquely set on a ridge with a few campsites provides an easy day hike or backpack trip. Unfortunately, Purcell Creek washed out the access road 1.3 miles before the trailhead, making it a bit more difficult for children.
  • Big Finn Hill Park is the lesser-known cousin to the adjoining Saint Edwards State Park in Kirkland. Its expansive 220 acres are worth exploring and getting to know for their miles of meandering trails fit for mountain biking and casual strolling. Chock-full of tall Douglas-firs, ferns and bright green mosses, it offers possibilities to spot eagles, deer and owls.
    47.7243368275 -122.236837149
    Big Finn Hill Park is the lesser-known cousin to the adjoining Saint Edwards State Park in Kirkland. Its expansive 220 acres are worth exploring and getting to know for their miles of meandering trails fit for mountain biking and casual strolling. Chock-full of tall Douglas-firs, ferns and bright green mosses, it offers possibilities to spot eagles, deer and owls.
  • Take a short dayhike in a ghost forest to a beautiful babbling brook on the southwest side of Mount St. Helens.
    46.1662492204 -122.262382507
    Take a short dayhike in a ghost forest to a beautiful babbling brook on the southwest side of Mount St. Helens.
  • The Boulder River trail is a nice hike that can be done any time of year. Come in winter while the rain is dripping off the mossy trees, photograph the waterfalls filled with spring snowmelt. Take the kids out for a little picnic in the summer, or leaf collecting in the fall. Come anytime midweek for quiet contemplation.
    48.2508833333 -121.817183333
    The Boulder River trail is a nice hike that can be done any time of year. Come in winter while the rain is dripping off the mossy trees, photograph the waterfalls filled with spring snowmelt. Take the kids out for a little picnic in the summer, or leaf collecting in the fall. Come anytime midweek for quiet contemplation.
  • Put your navigational skills to the test! This unmaintained trail just off Damfino Lakes trail may be brushy, but if you can find your way to Boundary Way, you'll be rewarded with breathtaking views into Canada and the epic North Cascades.
    48.9868695397 -121.934556412
    Put your navigational skills to the test! This unmaintained trail just off Damfino Lakes trail may be brushy, but if you can find your way to Boundary Way, you'll be rewarded with breathtaking views into Canada and the epic North Cascades.
  • This gorgeous loop hike has it all: big views of Mounts Baker and Shuksan, as well as the North Cascades, alpine lakes for swimming, and well-maintained trail winding through meadows and heather. And with wildflowers in spring, blueberry bushes for trail-side snacking in late summer and blazing color in the fall, you can't pick a bad season to visit.
    48.8469154753 -121.692504068
    This gorgeous loop hike has it all: big views of Mounts Baker and Shuksan, as well as the North Cascades, alpine lakes for swimming, and well-maintained trail winding through meadows and heather. And with wildflowers in spring, blueberry bushes for trail-side snacking in late summer and blazing color in the fall, you can't pick a bad season to visit.
  • Looking for an early-season backpack featuring craggy, snow-capped peaks, a sapphire-blue lake, a myriad of wildflowers, and a trail that’s regularly maintained by WTA volunteers? The 17-mile thru-hike on the Chelan Lakeshore Trail might be just the thing for you.
    48.14662855 -120.498302188
    Looking for an early-season backpack featuring craggy, snow-capped peaks, a sapphire-blue lake, a myriad of wildflowers, and a trail that’s regularly maintained by WTA volunteers? The 17-mile thru-hike on the Chelan Lakeshore Trail might be just the thing for you.
  • This year-round hike offers great views of the Columbia River Gorge along with enchanting stands of oak, cascading waterfalls, dramatic basalt outcroppings, and profuse wildflowers in the spring. Often sunny here while raining in Vancouver, it is a great place to hike while waiting for snow to melt at higher elevations.
    45.6996719 -121.4034048
    This year-round hike offers great views of the Columbia River Gorge along with enchanting stands of oak, cascading waterfalls, dramatic basalt outcroppings, and profuse wildflowers in the spring. Often sunny here while raining in Vancouver, it is a great place to hike while waiting for snow to melt at higher elevations.
  • Camp Long is a hidden gem, a 68-acre enclave in West Seattle featuring old growth forest, wildlife, a variety of hiking trails, rock climbing, ropes courses, camping, and environmental education.
    47.5554075648 -122.375319958
    Camp Long is a hidden gem, a 68-acre enclave in West Seattle featuring old growth forest, wildlife, a variety of hiking trails, rock climbing, ropes courses, camping, and environmental education.
  • This rugged hike is bound to become a classic, if it isn’t already. The full trail loop provides fantastic views of the Columbia River Gorge, an intimate look at the Cape Horn Falls and a challenging workout as it climbs and descends the rocky slopes of Cape Horn.
    45.5889961605 -122.178697586
    This rugged hike is bound to become a classic, if it isn’t already. The full trail loop provides fantastic views of the Columbia River Gorge, an intimate look at the Cape Horn Falls and a challenging workout as it climbs and descends the rocky slopes of Cape Horn.
  • The upper section of the CCC Road is just adjacent to the Middle Fork Road. Hiking this way, you'll avoid the somewhat confusing lower section, where DNR and private property bump up against each other. Here the trail is on National Forest land, so you'll need a Northwest Forest Pass, but the 3.4 miles to the Middle Fork Campground pass through uninterrupted quiet forest, creeks, and lovely views of the nearby peaks.
    47.548870304 -121.537864208
    The upper section of the CCC Road is just adjacent to the Middle Fork Road. Hiking this way, you'll avoid the somewhat confusing lower section, where DNR and private property bump up against each other. Here the trail is on National Forest land, so you'll need a Northwest Forest Pass, but the 3.4 miles to the Middle Fork Campground pass through uninterrupted quiet forest, creeks, and lovely views of the nearby peaks.
  • The Chewuch River Trail provides access to the very popular Cathedral Lakes area on the Boundary trail. Walk through a burn zone, lodgepole pine, and meadows as you travel deep into the Pasayten Wilderness.
    48.82305 -120.01972
    The Chewuch River Trail provides access to the very popular Cathedral Lakes area on the Boundary trail. Walk through a burn zone, lodgepole pine, and meadows as you travel deep into the Pasayten Wilderness.
  • Start at 200 feet above sea level and climb to a lofty, scenic peak of 4492 feet on a long, switchbacking trail through stunning old growth forest. WTA has done a lot of work on this trail to improve it after a huge storm in 2007.
    47.4974011058 -123.793215752
    Start at 200 feet above sea level and climb to a lofty, scenic peak of 4492 feet on a long, switchbacking trail through stunning old growth forest. WTA has done a lot of work on this trail to improve it after a huge storm in 2007.
  • Part of the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail, Clackamas Mountain Trail travels up to the summit of Clackamas Mountain with great views to the west. It then traverses down the north side to Cougar Creek and connects to the Cougar Creek #100 road.
    48.6805119979 -118.906853199
    Part of the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail, Clackamas Mountain Trail travels up to the summit of Clackamas Mountain with great views to the west. It then traverses down the north side to Cougar Creek and connects to the Cougar Creek #100 road.
  • The Chybinski Loop is located in the Cougar/Squak Mountain Corridor, and has many connecting trails and loop options.
    47.5065733534 -122.086651539
    The Chybinski Loop is located in the Cougar/Squak Mountain Corridor, and has many connecting trails and loop options.
  • Dalles Ridge is the primary way that hikers access the popular Noble Knob Trail and Ranger Creek. It provides hikers with a beautiful ridge walk after a steady climb from the trailhead.
    47.051112 -121.52366
    Dalles Ridge is the primary way that hikers access the popular Noble Knob Trail and Ranger Creek. It provides hikers with a beautiful ridge walk after a steady climb from the trailhead.
  • Covel Creek trail is a very short, one mile trail with only 50 feet of elevation gain. Hikers can travel through dense forest to a small waterfall, but there is an option to continue on the Angel Falls Loop, which creates a figure-eight, making this longer hike about 4 miles roundtrip.
    46.4388166667 -121.851983333
    Covel Creek trail is a very short, one mile trail with only 50 feet of elevation gain. Hikers can travel through dense forest to a small waterfall, but there is an option to continue on the Angel Falls Loop, which creates a figure-eight, making this longer hike about 4 miles roundtrip.
  • The south end of the William O. Douglas Wilderness is rolling country swathed in mature forest that is interrupted by dozens of named, and many more unnamed, lakes. A visit to scenic Cramer Lake, with its clear water, good fishing, and comfortable campsites will leave you wanting to explore deeper into the Tumac Plateau.
    46.6546429115 -121.360108852
    The south end of the William O. Douglas Wilderness is rolling country swathed in mature forest that is interrupted by dozens of named, and many more unnamed, lakes. A visit to scenic Cramer Lake, with its clear water, good fishing, and comfortable campsites will leave you wanting to explore deeper into the Tumac Plateau.
  • The trail climbs sharply through a forest of Douglas fir for a mile to a view of the Goat Rocks, Sawtooth Mountain, Mount Rainier, and Mount Adams. From this viewpoint you get a great view of Mount Adams and the Goat Rocks. It's worth bringing a camera for this one.
    46.0479509842 -121.754762916
    The trail climbs sharply through a forest of Douglas fir for a mile to a view of the Goat Rocks, Sawtooth Mountain, Mount Rainier, and Mount Adams. From this viewpoint you get a great view of Mount Adams and the Goat Rocks. It's worth bringing a camera for this one.
  • Hike through an old burn zone to reach an idyllic meadow high in the Entiat Mountains.
    48.0246343756 -120.650353432
    Hike through an old burn zone to reach an idyllic meadow high in the Entiat Mountains.
  • Are you looking for an early summer, dry-side, flowered workout? The eastern third of this trail is for you, with its many flowers and increasing views over the American River valley. Just be ready for the stark nature of the fire ravaged forest.
    46.95200163 -121.307156682
    Are you looking for an early summer, dry-side, flowered workout? The eastern third of this trail is for you, with its many flowers and increasing views over the American River valley. Just be ready for the stark nature of the fire ravaged forest.
  • The stunning views and unparalleled springtime flowers make this one of the most popular hikes in the Gorge. On a good day, you can get a bird’s eye view of Mount Hood and the Columbia River. In the spring the top is carpeted with vibrant yellow balsam root. Although the trail is steep and sometimes crowded, this hike is unquestionably worth the effort.
    45.6992666667 -121.706583333
    The stunning views and unparalleled springtime flowers make this one of the most popular hikes in the Gorge. On a good day, you can get a bird’s eye view of Mount Hood and the Columbia River. In the spring the top is carpeted with vibrant yellow balsam root. Although the trail is steep and sometimes crowded, this hike is unquestionably worth the effort.
  • Deception Pass State Park is one of the most popular Washington state parks and it is easy to see why. There are beautiful beaches, mature woodlands, great views, lakes, and a beautifully built bridge high on rocks above two narrow waterways. This nice trail will take you through all of this.
    48.4033833333 -122.647466667
    Deception Pass State Park is one of the most popular Washington state parks and it is easy to see why. There are beautiful beaches, mature woodlands, great views, lakes, and a beautifully built bridge high on rocks above two narrow waterways. This nice trail will take you through all of this.
  • Everything that makes a river hike fun is here, cool bridges, waterfalls, big trees, lots of dripping moss, and mushrooms.
    47.71205 -121.193633333
    Everything that makes a river hike fun is here, cool bridges, waterfalls, big trees, lots of dripping moss, and mushrooms.
  • Hike a rugged trail through second-growth hemlock forest. You'll cross several lively creeks and see waterfalls on your way to a high alpine lake well-stocked with trout.
    47.51735 -121.454216667
    Hike a rugged trail through second-growth hemlock forest. You'll cross several lively creeks and see waterfalls on your way to a high alpine lake well-stocked with trout.
  • A popular trail, thanks to its gentle, family friendly grade with amazing destinations. The natural water slide area at Denny Creek is a must visit for families! Keekwulee Falls offers a stunning viewpoint that is easily accessible. Snowshoe Falls maybe a bit elusive and more difficult to see from the trail, but is also a beautiful natural wonder.
    47.415354806 -121.443313121
    A popular trail, thanks to its gentle, family friendly grade with amazing destinations. The natural water slide area at Denny Creek is a must visit for families! Keekwulee Falls offers a stunning viewpoint that is easily accessible. Snowshoe Falls maybe a bit elusive and more difficult to see from the trail, but is also a beautiful natural wonder.
  • There are two routes up the north side of Silver Star Mountain that in good conditions can be combined to form a sort of loop. Along the way, hikers will be delighted with a diverse array of wildflowers, a natural arch, volcanic views and fine hiking.
    45.7672834695 -122.243328094
    There are two routes up the north side of Silver Star Mountain that in good conditions can be combined to form a sort of loop. Along the way, hikers will be delighted with a diverse array of wildflowers, a natural arch, volcanic views and fine hiking.
  • This hike contains all of what a classic Rainier outing should – a quiet canopy of old-growth forest, high alpine meadows bursting with wildflowers in the summer, and in-your-face-views of glaciated Mount Tahoma (not to mention Mounts Adams, St. Helens, and even Hood on a crystal clear day).
    46.7574521 -121.8057164
    This hike contains all of what a classic Rainier outing should – a quiet canopy of old-growth forest, high alpine meadows bursting with wildflowers in the summer, and in-your-face-views of glaciated Mount Tahoma (not to mention Mounts Adams, St. Helens, and even Hood on a crystal clear day).
  • This steep but shady trail features a rhododendron forest, and numerous saprophytic plants. At the end, it connects to a Forest Service road, allowing for additional wandering, to find views of Hood Canal and more.
    47.771 -122.91685
    This steep but shady trail features a rhododendron forest, and numerous saprophytic plants. At the end, it connects to a Forest Service road, allowing for additional wandering, to find views of Hood Canal and more.
  • If you like rugged, primitive trails, creek crossings with no bridges and finding a great view at the end of the trail, this hike is for you.
    45.8235957802 -122.164621353
    If you like rugged, primitive trails, creek crossings with no bridges and finding a great view at the end of the trail, this hike is for you.
  • The Dosewallips River Road is the gateway to the eastern Olympic Mountains and it penetrates one of the deepest canyons in Olympic National Park. Now closed to vehicles, the old road bed allows hikers to explore true wilderness at a gentle grade. Backpackers, peak baggers, and horseback riders take advantage of the easy access to the trails beyond the road's end.
    47.7413491759 -123.047442559
    The Dosewallips River Road is the gateway to the eastern Olympic Mountains and it penetrates one of the deepest canyons in Olympic National Park. Now closed to vehicles, the old road bed allows hikers to explore true wilderness at a gentle grade. Backpackers, peak baggers, and horseback riders take advantage of the easy access to the trails beyond the road's end.