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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

3974 Hikes

Puget Sound and Islands > Bellingham Area

 
1.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 192 ft.
Highest Point: 157 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(4 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
  • Coast
This hike boasts a great combination of wetland and sea shore. It is doable by hikers of all ages, and most of the trail is wheelchair accessible
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
10.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2300 ft.
Highest Point: 5300 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.88
(8 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
The snowshoe route into Commonwealth Basin is not clearly marked or blazed. Visitors here should plan their route in advance, go prepared for winter travel, and be able to identify avalanche risk.
 
 

North Cascades > Mount Baker Area

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 500 ft.
Highest Point: 1000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(17 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Established campsites
Magnificent old growth forests, stellar views of Mount Baker, turbulent tributaries, and, of course, a beautiful lake make this trail a great path to travel.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
8.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3800 ft.
Highest Point: 5629 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.45
(132 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Summits
  • Fall foliage

In winter the trail up Granite Mountain crosses a large avalanche chute early in the hike. Please have experience navigating avalanche terrain and the proper equipment when hiking this trail in the winter

The astounding views from the summit of the Granite Mountain trail come at a price. A nearly-1000-feet-of-elevation-gain-per-mile price. But views of pointed Kaleetan Peak, deep blue Crystal Lake, the climber-dotted Tooth, and Mount Rainier dominating the skyline to the south make it all worth it.
 
 

South Cascades > Mount St. Helens

 
10.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4500 ft.
Highest Point: 8365 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.49
(41 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Ridges/passes
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Summits
  • Fall foliage

Permits are required to summit Mount St. Helens. Find details about acquiring them in the hike description

Mount St. Helens is a peak that should be on every life list. And because it is an active volcano, it is best not to put it off for too long. Climbing to the crater rim is an opportunity to see not only amazing views in every direction, but to see geology raw, unformed and in its making.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
8.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2700 ft.
Highest Point: 4600 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.22
(93 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
The way to Melakwa Lake is like two different trails: first a wide gentle trail through old growth forest beneath an elevated and noisy Interstate freeway. And second, a rocky steep trail that follows a waterfall and a precipitous gorge upstream to get to a pair of clear alpine lakes flanked by rocky peaks. Is it about the journey or the destination? You decide.
 
 

North Cascades > Mountain Loop Highway

 
8.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 700 ft.
Highest Point: 1550 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.92
(131 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Rivers
The Boulder River trail is a nice hike that can be done any time of year. Come in winter while the rain is dripping off the mossy trees, photograph the waterfalls filled with spring snowmelt. Take the kids out for a little picnic in the summer, or leaf collecting in the fall. Come anytime midweek for quiet contemplation.
 
 

Central Cascades > Entiat Mountains/Lake Chelan

 
17.0 miles, one-way
Gain: 4030 ft.
Highest Point: 1700 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.09
(22 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
Looking for an early-season backpack featuring craggy, snow-capped peaks, a sapphire-blue lake, a myriad of wildflowers, and a trail that’s regularly maintained by WTA volunteers? The 17-mile thru-hike on the Chelan Lakeshore Trail might be just the thing for you.
 
 
 
5.5 miles, (type not yet set)
Gain: 1077 ft.
Highest Point: 1607 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(2 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Rivers
Hike a short stint on the Palouse to Cascades Trail, crossing high trestle bridges and roaming through old growth forest with expansive views of nearby peaks, just a short drive away from the city.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
8.4 miles, (type not yet set)
Gain: 2120 ft.
Highest Point: 3100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.25
(4 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
This hike on Rattlesnake Mountain near North Bend follows good trails through second-growth forest, with possible wildlife sightings. It leads to some outstanding high viewpoints. In spite of the name, there are no rattlesnakes here.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
4.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1160 ft.
Highest Point: 2078 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.05
(372 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Ridges/passes
  • Summits
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
This is a fine hike on a well maintained, albeit busy trail through a cool forest with views of the Cedar River watershed, Mount Si, Mount Washington, Rattlesnake Lake and Chester Morse Lake.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
8.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2000 ft.
Highest Point: 2521 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.45
(374 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Waterfalls
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
Lake Serene and Bridal Veil Falls compete for attention on this 7.2 mile trip. Either would be a worthy destination by themselves and combined they are a great day on the trail.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3150 ft.
Highest Point: 3900 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(258 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Summits
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
There are many reasons – besides its proximity to Seattle – why Mount Si is the most popular hike in the state: beautiful views, wildlife (some of it not so wild), old growth forest, and a dramatic summit worthy of a more remote peak. Rising dramatically above the Snoqualmie Valley, it serves as a literal and figurative gateway to the Cascades for thousands of hikers.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
9.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4000 ft.
Highest Point: 4822 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.21
(107 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Summits
  • Fall foliage
While still relatively steep, this new route up Mailbox Peak, built in part with help from WTA volunteers, offers a safer and more easily navigable way for folks to summit this formidable peak than the old trail.
 
 
 
8.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1500 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.65
(20 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
The Greg Ball Trail is a trail envisioned by and honoring one of the greatest trail advocates this state has ever had. Ball was a former board member and director of the WTA. In 1993 he launched the organization’s volunteer trail maintenance program which has since grown into the largest state-based program of its kind. He designed this trail to Wallace Lake and it was finished in his memory by volunteers from WTA and through support from the Spring Trail Trust.
 
 

Mount Rainier Area > Chinook Pass - Hwy 410

 
14.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1900 ft.
Highest Point: 4100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.77
(39 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
Visit a trail where rushing rivers, placid lakes, and wild forests abound.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
2.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 850 ft.
Highest Point: 1700 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.74
(84 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
Heybrook Lookout is a short and moderately steep hike through a fern and moss covered forest to a fun, staircase-ridden lookout with great views of the nearby mountains. If you are introducing someone to hiking, limited on time, or trying to add on another hike or activity in the area, this is the hike for you.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Salmon La Sac/Teanaway

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2600 ft.
Highest Point: 5034 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.11
(18 votes)

Parking is extremely limited at this location and only allowed in the designated parking area. Read our driving directions below for more information.

A steep but rewarding Cascades snowshoe with great views from the summit. Low avalanche risk makes this a popular winter destination.
 
 

Southwest Washington > Columbia River Gorge - WA

 
7.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1300 ft.
Highest Point: 1350 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.90
(20 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
This rugged hike is bound to become a classic, if it isn’t already. The full trail loop provides fantastic views of the Columbia River Gorge, an intimate look at the Cape Horn Falls and a challenging workout as it climbs and descends the rocky slopes of Cape Horn.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
4.0 miles of trails
Rating:
Average rating:
2.50
(2 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
SHADOW (Save Habitat And Diversity Of Wetlands) Lake Nature Preserve is a lovely, small park in Renton that is home to a 5,000 year old peat bog with a short, universally-accessible half-mile boardwalk trail that leads into the heart of the bog.
 
 

Issaquah Alps

 
1.25 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 20 ft.
Highest Point: 420 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.50
(2 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
Hike an easy loop trail through a wide forested buffer zone around this lowland lake. Appreciate the many tall trees that give the illusion of being in a much more remote location, and enjoy the view from a dock from which the entire lake can be seen. In season, see a variety of waterfowl.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
3.0 miles of trails
Gain: 120 ft.
Highest Point: 290 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.67
(6 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
Don’t let the thought of the Brightwater Treatment Plant prevent you from hiking through the Brightwater Center’s 70-acre suburban wetland and woodland preserve that serves as a refuge for local wildlife and plant species. The trails at Brightwater are ideal for families, birdwatchers, pets, and children.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
1.85 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 292 ft.
Highest Point: 515 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.33
(12 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Rivers
A short hike through history, the Ranger Hole trailhead features a ranger’s cabin built over 100 years ago, a short trail through a re-growing forest, and a walk down to the turquoise waters of the Duckabush River.
 
 

Southwest Washington > Columbia River Gorge - WA

 
147.5 miles, one-way
Gain: 27996 ft.
Highest Point: 7800 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(5 votes)
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Summits
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Fall foliage
Offering spectacular views of the three southern volcanoes in Washington, lakes, meadows and wildlife over relatively moderate terrain, Section H is the perfect starting point for the Washington portion of the Pacific Crest Trail.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
1.2 miles, one-way
Gain: 10 ft.
Highest Point: 23 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.75
(4 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Rivers
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Coast
Clallam Bay Spit Community Beach County Park is a unique, 1.2-mile stretch of shoreline 45 miles west of Port Angeles towards Neah Bay, perfect for stretching your legs, bird watching and beachcombing for ocean treasures. Quietly tucked into a curve on SR-112 as you enter the quaint town of Clallam Bay, it offers year-round restrooms and a dog-friendly place to picnic, walk and learn about local shipping history.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Bellingham Area

 
1.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 22 ft.
Highest Point: 317 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
Walk along a quiet flat grassy trail with plenty of space to take picnic breaks in some quiet, not far from the city.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
10.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.43
(21 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
This is a wonderful wild park right in the backyard of those who live in the Everett area. Covering 1,463 acres of forest, ponds and meadows, the river valley is a confluence of the Issaquah, Tulalip, Stillaguamish, and Snoqualmie Tribal treaty areas. Hikers can roam all day on the network of trails leading through the forest, down to the Snohomish River and up to views of the Cascades and Snohomish valley. Explore, and keep an eye out for the wildlife that live in these woods.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Northern Coast

 
7.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 850 ft.
Highest Point: 1166 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.50
(18 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Coast
Visit a multi-use trail to a summit that boasts coastal scenery, forests, rocky bluffs, tidepools, and a hearty climb to a 1,166-foot viewpoint over the Strait of Juan de Fuca
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
2.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 10 ft.
Highest Point: 3000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.82
(28 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
The flat terrain of this wide valley east of Snoqualmie Pass is the perfect place to practice snowshoeing with kids or first-timers. This is an area popular with cross-country skiers, and you may spot beaver dams and other winter wildlife. From Mardee Lake to looming Kendall Peak before you, this is premiere terrain for winter enthusiasts.
 
 

Central Washington > Potholes Region

 
12.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 625 ft.
Highest Point: 1200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.11
(64 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
View one of the best examples of a recessional-cataract canyon. Potholes Coulee caught the attention of J Harlen Bretz in the early 20th century, which led to his “outrageous hypothesis” of Ice Age flooding.