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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

3961 Hikes

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
2.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 10 ft.
Highest Point: 3000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.81
(26 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
The flat terrain of this wide valley east of Snoqualmie Pass is the perfect place to practice snowshoeing with kids or first-timers. This is an area popular with cross-country skiers, and you may spot beaver dams and other winter wildlife. From Mardee Lake to looming Kendall Peak before you, this is premiere terrain for winter enthusiasts.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
2.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 850 ft.
Highest Point: 1700 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.73
(81 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
Heybrook Lookout is a short and moderately steep hike through a fern and moss covered forest to a fun, staircase-ridden lookout with great views of the nearby mountains. If you are introducing someone to hiking, limited on time, or trying to add on another hike or activity in the area, this is the hike for you.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Kitsap Peninsula

 
4.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 50 ft.
Highest Point: 430 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.50
(2 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
Banner Forest Heritage Park is one square mile of undeveloped forest and wetland on the Kitsap Peninsula with an extensive trail network. An easy grade and well maintained trails invite all ages and abilities to enjoy this prime section of land.
 
 

South Cascades > Mount Adams Area

 
12.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1700 ft.
Highest Point: 6100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.80
(5 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
Burnt Rock is a scenic, fire-scarred outcrop near the Pacific Crest Trail on the west side of Mount Adams. The best way to approach Burnt Rock is via Divide Camp Trail. This route offers the easiest climb to the PCT, after which point the hike becomes a nearly level promenade of vistas, wildflowers, and cascades.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Snoqualmie Pass

 
10.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3920 ft.
Highest Point: 5330 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.22
(9 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Summits
  • Lakes
A scramble up a peak above Gem Lake. Climbing gear and experience required.
 
 

Central Washington > Yakima

 
1.9 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 130 ft.
Highest Point: 2500 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.73
(15 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Waterfalls
Hike downhill, enjoy spring blooms and throw rocks into a punchbowl at the bottom of a 40-foot waterfall.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > Cle Elum Area

 
Highest Point: 2500 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.50
(2 votes)
The Crystal Springs Sno-Park is a hub for winter recreation. The trails here are open to snowmobilers, cross-country skiers and snowshoers. Some routes are groomed, while others are unmaintained.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Cougar Mountain

 
4.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1200 ft.
Highest Point: 1598 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.17
(36 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Summits
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
Hike trails named in honor of mountaineers Jim Whittaker and Nawang Gombu, of 1963 Mount Everest ascent fame. Wilderness Peak may not be Everest, but it is the highest point in King County's Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park and it does have some wonderful old-growth conifers. This loop offers a diversity of steep forested hillsides, huge mossy boulders, and a low swampy area traversed via a narrow boardwalk.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Tiger Mountain

 
3.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1760 ft.
Highest Point: 1850 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.07
(83 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Summits
  • Good for kids
  • Fall foliage
Hike a short but steep trail with many stone steps. Pause at a viewpoint offering a fine view of Mount Rainier, then continue on to Poo Poo Point itself, only 1.9 miles from the trailhead. Enjoy views to the northwest, and perhaps watch paragliders sailing off into the sky.
 
 

Issaquah Alps

 
30.0 miles of trails
Gain: 550 ft.
Highest Point: 1100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.54
(13 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Wildlife

Some trails in the trail system may not be accessible between October 15 - April 15 due to seasonal closures.

The extensive trail system at Taylor Mountain Forest is used by equestrians, hikers, and mountain bikers. This working forest is intended to demonstrate environmentally sound forest management, protect and restore ecological systems and provide passive recreational opportunities. Taylor Mountain is dominated by mature red alder trees. Trail users will see recent efforts to convert some of the forests from red alder to conifers.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
4.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1160 ft.
Highest Point: 2078 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.05
(370 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Ridges/passes
  • Summits
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
This is a fine hike on a well maintained, albeit busy trail through a cool forest with views of the Cedar River watershed, Mount Si, Mount Washington, Rattlesnake Lake and Chester Morse Lake.
 
 

Central Cascades > Stevens Pass - West

 
5.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1300 ft.
Highest Point: 1500 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.11
(291 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Waterfalls
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Rivers
An accessible hike for seasoned veterans and neophytes alike, Wallace Falls provides visitors with breathtaking views of the Wallace River and the surrounding falls on a relatively low difficulty, scenic 5.6 mile round-trip. Although well attended and often busy, the trail stands as a true showcase of the diversity and majestic beauty that the Central Cascades can offer to hikers who journey into the heart of this sublime mountain range.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Hood Canal

 
6.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 600 ft.
Highest Point: 3100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.31
(13 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Established campsites
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Rivers
The Upper Dungeness River trail is an easy stroll along a roaring river and among towering trees. It’s great for all ages (as long as the trail is snow- and ice-free), and the shelter at Camp Handy is a welcome and dry lunch destination on rainy days.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Palouse and Blue Mountains

 
5.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2500 ft.
Highest Point: 5200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Dogs allowed on leash
A short, steep climb out of the Tucannon River valley up to National Forest Road 4022
 
 

Olympic Peninsula > Pacific Coast

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1400 ft.
Highest Point: 650 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.10
(10 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs not allowed
  • Rivers
Take a short but very scenic hike starting from the Altair campground in Olympic National Park. Traverse along the edge of the Elwha River, recently free-flowing thanks to the removal of the Glines Canyon Dam.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Squak Mountain

 
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
 
 

North Cascades > North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
1.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 0 ft.
Highest Point: 300 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Rivers
This is a nice little leg stretcher just off the North Cascades Highway. Especially good in winter, when the highway is closed, and the eagles are feeding along the Skagit River.
 
 

Mount Rainier Area > Chinook Pass - Hwy 410

 
2.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 473 ft.
Highest Point: 5238 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.15
(13 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Summits
  • Good for kids
Reaching the summit of Suntop can require considerable energy (a 16-mile hike), or it can be a simple 2-mile walk, depending on whether or not the 2 gates are open. Wide views of Mount Rainier and the White River valley below are worth it either way.
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Cougar Mountain

 
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
 
 

Issaquah Alps > Tiger Mountain

 
1.5 miles, one-way
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 1750 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Old growth
  • Dogs allowed on leash
This well-built and mostly level trail runs connects the Iverson Railroad trail (shared Mountain bike) with the Tiger Mountain Trail at Zieg's Zag, It's about 1.5 miles from the Iverson trail to the TMT. This is in the area connecting the Highway 18 Tiger Summit trailhead and the South Tiger Loop area.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Spokane Area/Coeur d'Alene

 
25.0 miles of trails
Rating:
Average rating:
4.50
(2 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
Trail 25 is the main artery that runs through Riverside State Park. Loop options abound here, as do out-and-backs, or just short wanderings.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Spokane Area/Coeur d'Alene

 
15.0 miles of trails
Highest Point: 3366 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
5.00
(1 vote)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Summits
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
Acquired in four phases through Spokane County’s Conservation Futures Program, with additional funding secured through the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office, the Antoine Peak Conservation Area offers fantastic views overlooking Liberty Lake, the Spokane Valley, and north to Mount Spokane and the Selkirk Range.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Spokane Area/Coeur d'Alene

 
3.46 miles of trails
Gain: 670 ft.
Highest Point: 2920 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(1 vote)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
Antoine Peak's Canfield Gulch is the east side access to this 1,296 acre conservation area.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Spokane Area/Coeur d'Alene

 
1.23 miles, roundtrip
Highest Point: 1880 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.40
(5 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes
  • Fall foliage
Bear Lake Regional Park has a short hiking trail and is a popular spot for families.
 
 

South Cascades > Dark Divide

 
4.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2100 ft.
Highest Point: 4000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.75
(12 votes)
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Lakes
  • Established campsites
  • Waterfalls
Although this is a short hike, it's a decent challenge because it's a narrow, steep trail. The terrain is interesting, with waterfalls and its trademark basalt columns. If you like solitude, this is the trail for you.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Spokane Area/Coeur d'Alene

 
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Fall foliage
  • Rivers
One of several short connector trails within the vast trail network of Riverside State Park.
 
 

Puget Sound and Islands > Seattle-Tacoma Area

 
0.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 0 ft.
Highest Point: 39 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
Families will enjoy this small community park in the city of Woodinville. Take a walk in the woods along a half-mile boardwalk loop trail or blow off some steam on the playground pr climbing boulder.
 
 

Eastern Washington > Palouse and Blue Mountains

 
5.6 miles, one-way
Gain: 2500 ft.
Highest Point: 5600 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.20
(5 votes)
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Ridges/passes
  • Wildlife
  • Established campsites
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Rivers
Wildflowers, wildlife, and great views of Eastern Washington’s wild Blue Mountains: the Panjab Loop Trail offers it all.
 
 

South Cascades > White Pass/Cowlitz River Valley

 
4.5 miles, one-way
Gain: 1200 ft.
Highest Point: 4080 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
  • Mountain views
  • Old growth
  • Dogs allowed on leash

Skate Creek Road (FR-52) is closed from milepost 5.7 (north end) to milepost 18.5 (south end) for the winter.

This lesser known hike connects two forest service roads via a gentle trail that takes visitors through a shady forest of old growth.
 
 

Snoqualmie Region > North Bend Area

 
5.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4000 ft.
Highest Point: 4822 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.41
(140 votes)
  • Summits
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Mountain views
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth

The upper Mailbox trailhead closed. The lower trailhead is open but may have unconsolidated snow or compacted snow & ice. High-clearance vehicles with AWD/4WD recommended.

You may have heard Mailbox Peak mentioned in slightly hushed tones, the kind reserved for stories about some legendary storm or a bad accident. What inspires such reverence? The original route, which entails 4,000 feet of climbing in less than three miles. The newer, gentler trail takes twice as much distance to achieve the summit, but nothing will permanently erase the original trail's fearsome reputation.