Trails for everyone, forever

Home Our Work Lost Trails Found
link


A scenic view from the upper reaches of the Entiat ValleyRecovering Entiat Trails

In 2021, we were able to give the wildfire hotspot some extra attention thanks to our first ever backcountry pro crew.

Crew leader LeeAnne saws out a fallen log from the Pratt River Trail.Reviving the Pratt River

We're clearing the way on this alternate access point into the Alpine Lakes Wilderness.



Trails link people and wild places. They provide us with a place to reconnect with nature—and each other.

But every year, more are more trails are in danger of falling off the map.

Budgets for public lands continue to shrink, making it harder and harder to keep our backcountry trails open and accessible. Without the maintenance they need, Washington’s trails are slowly becoming lost.

Our Lost Trails Found campaign is working to save trails that are at-risk of disappearing completely — preserving access to our stunning backcountry for generations to come. Through your generous support, boots-on-the-ground volunteer trail maintenance, voices in Congress and innovative partnerships, we are putting trails back on the map.




What is a "Lost Trail"?


Lost trails are places that haven’t been getting the care they need in order to make them accessible to the growing number of hikers. Learn more about how trails become lost & found.






Take Action

Together, we can stop trails from falling off the map. Your donations make this work possible. You can also help by hiking and writing trip reports for lesser-used trail and speaking up for public lands.





Where We're Working


WTA has chosen three priority areas to focus our Lost Trails efforts and create a model for trails across the state. In addition to restoring our three priority areas, we have committed to improving 40 more backcountry trails that are at-risk of becoming lost. 


Boundary Trail by Ben Fox.jpg

Milk Creek by Britt LAa.jpg

Angry Mountain by Gabe Smith.jpg