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Bridle Trails State Park

Puget Sound and Islands

Bridle Trails State Park offers more than 28 miles of pleasant, forested trails conveniently located between Bellevue and Kirkland. This park is popular with horseback riders, so while dogs are allowed, they must be kept on leash to avoid startling horses. Continue reading

Location

Puget Sound and Islands -- Seattle-Tacoma Area
Jump to Map & Directions

Length

3.5 miles, roundtrip

Elevation

Gain: 450 ft.
Highest Point: 525 ft.

Rating

3.17 out of 5

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  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Wildlife
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes

Parking Pass/Entry Fee

Discover Pass

Bridle Trails State Park offers more than 28 miles of pleasant, forested trails conveniently located between Bellevue and Kirkland. It is a dedicated horse park, so expect to encounter horseback riders during a hike here. And while dogs are allowed, they must be kept on leash to avoid startling horses.

Nestled amid a quiet neighborhood of horse ranches and single-family homes, this 482-acre park has served largely as an equestrian recreation area since the 1950s. The winding, forested trails have also proven to be popular with other trail users, namely hikers, trail runners and dog walkers. Routes wind through a sea of second-growth trees standing at attention under which lush ferns carpet the forest floor.


The three main loop trails offer varying lengths of casual forest strolling: the mile-long Raven Trail, the interpretive Trillium Trail (1.7 miles) and the Coyote Trail (3.5 miles).

The minimal elevation gain also makes these trails extremely kid-friendly. All three loop trails start from a central junction just a short walk from the main parking area. The Coyote Trail starts in tandem with the Trillium Trail for the first half mile, then forks to the left at an intersection. It continues to loop the perimeter of the park, offering a good opportunity to stretch your legs and fully enjoy the park's flora and fauna.

Under western red cedar and other conifers, look for Oregon grape, spotted coralroot and Himalayan blackberry. A variety of birds—from hummingbirds to eagles— can be observed within the forest canopy. The Coyote Trail eventually loops back to the central junction and parking area, where you can explore the smaller loops or visit the horse training ring.

WTA Pro Tip: Work the trails in a clockwise direction so that the trail symbol signs face you throughout your hike. They’re only attached to one side of the posts and can be easy to miss if going the opposite direction.

Hike by WTA Correspondents
Kristen Sapowicz

Bridle Trails State Park

Map & Directions

Trailhead
Co-ordinates: 47.6550, -122.1843 Open in Google Maps

Trailhead

Puget Sound and Islands -- Seattle-Tacoma Area

Washington State Parks

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Toilet Information

  • Toilet at trailhead

More information about toilets

Getting There

driving directions

From I-405 north, take exit 17, signed for NE 70th St. Turn right onto 116th Ave NE. At the NE 60th St stop sign, continue straight ahead to the park.

Take Transit

This trailhead is accessible by bus! Plan your visit by bus using TOTAGO, or consult the schedule for King County Metro RapidRide B Line, route number 221, route number 225, or route number 245.

Parking Pass/Entry Fee

Discover Pass
 

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Bridle Trails State Park

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