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Swofford Pond

South Cascades > White Pass/Cowlitz River Valley
46.4999, -122.3890 Map & Directions
Length
3.8 miles, roundtrip
Elevation Gain
140 feet
Highest Point
922 feet
Calculated Difficulty About Calculated Difficulty
Easy/Moderate
Vibrant greens at Swofford Pond. Photo by Shannon Cunningham. Full-size image
  • Wildflowers/Meadows
  • Wildlife
  • Dogs allowed on leash
  • Old growth
  • Good for kids
  • Lakes

Parking Pass/Entry Fee

Discover Pass

The South Swofford Pond Trail is a joint venture by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Cowlitz River Project of Tacoma Power and runs almost two miles around the south side of Swofford Pond to its southwest corner. It is an easy graded, mostly wooded trail that offers plenty of opportunities to view wildlife, marvel at old-growth cedars and enjoy glimpses of the surrounding Swofford Valley. Continue reading

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Hiking Swofford Pond

The South Swofford Pond Trail is a joint venture by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Cowlitz River Project of Tacoma Power and runs almost two miles around the south side of Swofford Pond to its southwest corner. It is a moderately-graded, mostly wooded trail that offers plenty of opportunities to view wildlife, marvel at old-growth cedars and enjoy glimpses of the surrounding Swofford Valley.

The trailhead is just a few hundred feet away from where Riffe Lake is separated from Swofford Pond by a spillway. The 240-acre shallow stocked pond was originally created to rear juvenile steelhead but is now managed for warm water fish. You are more likely to see hopeful fisherman with their poles in the water than other hikers on this ramble around the lake. The wide trail starts off relatively close to the water, walking past tall grass, Fringecup, sword fern and cattails. 

The alder and hemlock trees are well spaced, leaving plenty of room for sunlight to filter down on the snails and millipedes as they share the path with you. You can also expect that being close to the water here could mean a swampy trail in the wetter months of the year.

The trail narrows a bit at a quarter mile in and moves up into the forest but still runs parallel along the water. You will find yourself walking between huge moss covered cedar giants with wood sorrel carpeting the forest floor and you may find yourself looking for leprechauns, although you are more likely to see the local elk munching a snack. Take time to climb a few of those old trees, plenty have good places to kids to take post and listening to birds singing. There are a few small streams to hop over before you reach a sturdy bridge over Sulphur Creek a half mile into your trek. The trail will alternate between decommissioned road and groomed tread, just keep to the right with the contour of the pond.

About three-quarters of a mile in, the trail again takes you down closer to the water and you will catch a few views through the tall grass, Indian Plum and maple. There are trail markers that begin here to lead you the rest of the way.  The trail continues to be relatively level and there are puncheon bridges and turnpikes to help you over most of the swampy areas. Here the hearty vegetation will most likely crowd the trail, watch out for stinging nettles and salmonberry.

Just shy of two miles in, the trail ends and you can step down towards the pond for a view of rowboats floating lazily on the water and the surrounding farmland with the Swofford Valley hillside for a backdrop. It may be possible to continue around further on a fisherman’s trail but it will most likely be overgrown and hard to follow. Go ahead and enjoy the view, then return the way you came. If you are looking to fish or sit right next to the water you would have to go off trail here, the best spots for catching dinner seem to be on the north side of the pond along the road.

Hike Description Written by
Shannon Leader, WTA Correspondent

Swofford Pond

Map & Directions

Trailhead
Co-ordinates: 46.4999, -122.3890 Open in Google Maps

Before You Go

See weather forecast

Parking Pass/Entry Fee

Discover Pass

WTA Pro Tip: Save a copy of our directions before you leave! App-based driving directions aren't always accurate and data connections may be unreliable as you drive to the trailhead.

Getting There

Drive east on Highway 12 towards White Pass 20.2 miles and turn right towards the town of Mossyrock at the light for Williams Street. Drive past the bus barn and junior high school to State Street and turn left.  This will take you through the town of Mossyrock as the road becomes Mossyrock Road E. 

In 2.5 miles there is a Y and you keep right on to Swofford Road as it curves through farmland. In 1.4 miles there is a bend in the road to the right and you will see a sign and pullout for Swofford Pond. 

Continue around the lake on Green Mountain Road (0.5 miles) until you drive over the spillway and you will see the trailhead on your right with parking on the shoulder. Discover Pass required. There is a portable privy available.

More Hike Details

Trailhead

South Cascades > White Pass/Cowlitz River Valley

South Swofford Pond Trail (#)

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Cowlitz Wildlife Area

Guidebooks & Maps

USGS Coyote Mountain

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Swofford Pond

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