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Poo Poo Point

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It's time to go back to high school. Or maybe flight school. This Tiger Mountain path starts at Issaquah High School and ends at Poo Poo Point, where many paraglider pilots learn to fly their featherweight crafts. In between, you'll find wonderful old forests to explore and a grand path to follow.

Hike up the old railway turned trail about 0.25 mile before veering right onto the service road known as the Old State Road. Walk around the gate on this road and continue about 1 mile. Just after crossing an old clear-cut, climb under some high-tension powerlines and continue up the rocky slope. Stay right at the next trail junction (to the left is the Section Line Trail) to hop onto the Poo Poo Point Trail. Limited views southwest reveal Squak Mountain.

Like so many Issaquah Alps trails, the Poo Poo Point Trail was born from an old road. The path is still wide enough for two hikers to trek side-by-side much of the time. More often, however, thick wildflowers and bushes (some laden with delicious salmonberries) line the route and crowd it down to a single-track trail.

At about 2 miles you'll cross a broad plateau (elev. 1150 ft) before starting up into Many Creeks Valley. Some of the creeks giving the valley its name are seasonal, running only in spring, while others--notably Gap Creek--runs year round. The well-built Gap Creek Bridge is at 2.5 miles, from which you can view the creek's stairstep falls and the remains of an old road bridge.

Past the creek, the trail continues to weave upward through the forest. You'll find some wonderful ancient trees, and plenty of reminders of the region's logging history (hint: look for old stumps with springboard notches). At 3.2 miles, stay right at the intersection with the West Tiger Railroad Grade.

In just another 0.5 mile, you'll come out into a small parking area, complete with high-tech composting toilet. Follow the trail around to the right side of the parking area to burst out into the bright sunshine on the grass bench that is Poo Poo Point. Hang gliders and paragliders launch off this grassy swale most afternoons spring through early autumn. Nonpilots can rest on the grassy hillside above the launch area, enjoying views of Issaquah Valley, Lake Sammamish, and the Bellevue skyline beyond. On clear days, Mount Baker can even be seen in the distance.
Driving Directions:

From I-90 take exit 17 (Front Street) and turn right (south). After 0.6 mile turn left (east) onto East Sunset Way, and in two blocks turn right onto 2nd Avenue SE. In about 0.5 mile park near the high school. The trail begins just south of the school on the switchback of the old railroad grade.

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Recent Trip Reports

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There are 220 trip reports for this hike. See all trip reports for this hike.
Poo Poo Point — Mar 23, 2014 — aschechter88
Day hike
Issues: Mudholes | Water on trail
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What an excellent way to start the season. We started from the high school trail, just after 12 noon...
What an excellent way to start the season. We started from the high school trail, just after 12 noon, temperature in the Issaquah valley in the mid-50s and very sunny. There were many hikers (and dogs, so many dogs) going up and down, but it never felt crowded. Flowers and trees are just budding; there isn't much to see in the way of foliage yet. There's a few muddy spots on the trail, but nothing you don't expect this time of year. Total climb time was 1h45m, and we were rewarded with the spectacle of several dozen paragliders flinging themselves off the mountain and into the sky. Breezy and a little colder at the top, but nice and sunny. Visibility 10m+ in all directions; hazy beyond that. Descent took about 1h20m due to trail traffic and some slippery spots. A great day on the trail!
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Poo Poo Point — Mar 21, 2014 — Drosera
Day hike
Issues: Mudholes | Water on trail
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Clear skies! It was a LOT colder and windier at the top than we had expected, despite the good weath...
Clear skies! It was a LOT colder and windier at the top than we had expected, despite the good weather. Many people were out and about along the trail and up at the top to watch the paragliders.

We started at the trailhead just south of the Issaquah high school and were delighted to find a couple of streams and a river on the way up. There was a lot of Devil's Club that hasn't grown foliage yet - it should look pretty cool in a couple of months. Saw some trillium on the way down.

We took the shorter (Chirico) trail down to save time - pretty crowded.
Overall a good hike, although I will say that it was not a first choice since my friend and I have no means of transportation other than the bus.
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Poo Poo Point , West Tiger Railroad Grade, Section Line Trail, High School Trail — Feb 28, 2014 — HikingwiththeBlackDog
Day hike
Issues: Bridge out | Mudholes | Water on trail
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Beautiful day not to be wasted indoors! Thought I would continue my "re-exploration" of the West Ti...
Beautiful day not to be wasted indoors! Thought I would continue my "re-exploration" of the West Tiger Railroad Grade trail and get in a little conditioning. Trail Dog Lucy had other commitments and I got off to a late start so I decided on a loop starting in Issaquah at the Sunset TH and meeting up with the High School trail, Poo Poo Point trail, West Tiger RR grade and returning via the Section Line trail to the High School trail. I had traveled all of these with the exception of the "unmaintained" portion of Section Line.

Other than a few muddy spots all the tread up to the junction with the Rail Road grade is in great shape. You are in many creeks valley so expect water on the trails and mud here and there. Things are looking up on the badly neglected Rail Road grade trail and this will be a great connector for the North side of West Tiger once the WTA completes their work. In the meantime, a few cautions.

There is one impressive mud hole about 1/2 mile in. There is really no good path around it so, embrace the muck! Further on, you can see evidence of bridge and tread work by WTA. This will be awesome when complete but use great care now as there are several stream crossings where the bridge decking and approaches are unfinished and accordingly tricky to negotiate. Be careful!

Once past the water hazards the trail gets a little rougher but still easy to follow. About 1 1/2 miles in you encounter a junction with the "Section Line" trail which connects the summit of West Tiger 3 with the High School trail. Since it was getting late in the afternoon I decided to take this back instead of pushing on to the WT 3 trail.

  I had been warned this was a steep, unmaintained section of trail and this is no joke! From the Railroad grade to the "Maintained" section of trail, it drops (or gains depending upon your direction of travel) about 800 feet in less than 1/2 mile. Unmaintained is a good description too! Lots of rocks and roots. I was glad to be heading down rather than up on my introduction to this piece of trail!

The remainder of the trip was uneventful with the notable exception of the single remaining stream crossing on the maintained portion of Section Line. It consists of a few slippery logs and parts of what might have been a rude bridge at one time. There is really no good footing to cross so use great caution if you come this way. A better option would be to take the right turn at the junction and follow the Talus Cave trail down.

A great walk in the woods on a warm sunny day! About 9 miles and maybe 2,000 feet elevation.
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West Tiger Railroad Grade, Poo Poo Point , Adventure Trail, West Tiger 3 — Jan 18, 2014 — Old Rod
Day hike
Issues: Overgrown | Water on trail
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Starting off Sunset, we headed up hill to the plateau. The trail is a bit steep in places, but well ...
Starting off Sunset, we headed up hill to the plateau. The trail is a bit steep in places, but well maintained. At the plateau is a nice park bench overlooking Issaquah (see picture)

Next hiked over Adventure trail, which is a very nice woodsy trail.

Then followed Poo Poo point trail up hill for a few miles. This trail is also maintained very well, and has a few bridges with nice creeks. The valley is named Many Creeks Valley.

At the junction for Poo Poo Point, One View trail and West RR grade we headed along West Tiger RR. This trail is not maintained very well, and over the years, the railroad grade is mostly gone.

When we got to the "unmaintained" Section trail we headed up the steep 1/2 mile climb to the summit of West Tiger 3. This is a popular summit for many hikers, but the views are scant with many trees. See picture for our view looking over the fog below.

We headed down the steep Section grade back to Poo Poo Point trail. Once we were past the unmaintained section, the trail became good and fast, with one good creek crossing.

Out final leg, took us over the wetland trail (rather than taking the Adventure trail). A very nice Round lake resides along this trail. Since it was getting dark we donned our head lamps and did not get a good look at this area.

Total hike around 9 miles with a total altitude climb of 3100 feet.

Best reason to hike Tiger now is that there is not enough good snow or weather in the mountains, to snow shoe.
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Poo Poo Point — Dec 25, 2013 — Amaroq
Day hike
Issues: Mudholes | Water on trail
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Great way to spend Christmas Day! Had some trouble knowing where to park - ended up parking in th...
Great way to spend Christmas Day!

Had some trouble knowing where to park - ended up parking in the high school lot since it was closed today. And then had a bit of trouble finding the trailhead, as it was not marked from the parking lot. But from there it was a great hike. A bit of water and mud on the trail, so good boots are recommended. Very mossy and green. Watched a woodpecker on a stump. Best part is the incredible view from the top - above the fog and in the sun.
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Poo-Poo Point Coe.jpg
WTA worked here!
2010
Location
Poo Poo Point (#TIGER)
Issaquah Alps -- Tiger Mountain
Department of Natural Resources, South Puget Sound Region
Statistics
Roundtrip 7.4 miles
Elevation Gain 1650 ft
Highest Point 1850 ft
Features
Old growth
Mountain views
Wildlife
User info
Dogs allowed on leash
May encounter pack animals
Discover Pass required
Guidebooks & Maps
Snoqualmie Pass
Green Trails Tiger Mountain No. 204S

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Note: the description and driving directions for this Mountaineers Books entry are copyrighted and can't be changed.

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Red MarkerPoo Poo Point
47.52375 -122.026183333
  • Trail Work 2010
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