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How to Poop in the Woods

Just because you’re miles away from the modern conveniences of indoor plumbing does not mean that doing your duty has to be a chore.

Just because you’re miles away from the modern conveniences of indoor plumbing does not mean that doing your duty has to be a chore.

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A full kit of backcountry bathroom essentials. Photo by Charlie Wakenshaw.

Use a pit toilet or privy. Many backcountry camps offer pit toilets. If one is available, use it. Pit toilets are the most sanitary option and help prevent the pollution of camping areas and water sources.

If no toilet is available, then you will need to dig a cat hole. Here are three easy steps

1

Choose a site at least 200 feet from water, trails and your camp.

2

Using a small trowel, dig a hole 6 to 8 inches deep in which to do your business and bury your waste.

3

Use a duct tape-wrapped resealable bag to pack out your used toilet paper.

Use a blue bag (WAG bag). In some areas, including the popular hiking trails at Mount Baker and climbing Mount Rainier, hikers need to use a blue bag to do their duty and carry their waste out with them.

TIPS FOR DIAPERS AND DOG WASTE

Diaper tips: If you are backpacking with a baby, you will have to create a system for diapers. Always pack out dirty diapers. Do not burn or bury diapers, which is very harmful to the environment.

  • When packing for your trip be sure to pack more diapers than you think you will need and realize that they will be heavier (and bigger) when you pack them out than when you pack them.
  • Dirty diapers wrapped tightly in plastic bags helps to keep the smell down.
  • Cloth diapers can be laid out in the sun to dry before being wrapped.
  • Follow the lead of one family who has created a hybrid reusable/disposable system.

Dogs tips: When it comes to dogs, you have two options: bury it or pack it out. Pack a trowel and bury the waste as you would your own. Alternatively, pack it out in a plastic baggie.

  • If you're packing pet waste out, keep the baggie with you. Don't stash it alongside the trail or leave it hanging from a tree. (If you don't want to carry it in your pack for the whole hike, get your dog a backpack and have your pup pack it out.)
  • Keeping your pup on leash will help you keep track of where she does her business.

    Keep learning

    Get into the finer points of this Leave No Trace basic with the resources below. When do you need to pack it out? When and where should you bury your business following Leave No Trace principles? Watch the video below, and learn how to do it right.