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Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

With more people discovering a love for trails, it's important to ensure the trail system can manage the increased needs. Here's how WTA is working on that goal in one part of Washington.

As you probably noticed, trails saw more traffic than ever last year. Thousands discovered a new appreciation for hiking (or rekindled a latent love of it) as we sought exercise and a mental break from the stresses of a pandemic. This uptick in time spent outside highlighted a need we have known of for years: that of more investment, in both trails and the infrastructure that supports them.

Mount Dickerman flowers in the spring. Photo by YogiMtnMama
Wildflowers bob in the wind on a summer day on Mount Dickerman. WTA is working to preserve places like this with our Trails Rebooted efforts. Photo by YogiMtnMama.

Several areas across the state felt this stress especially, including the Mountain Loop Highway. With its gorgeous scenery, variety of trails and proximity to the growing population of Snohomish County, the already-apparent need for investment was even more evident during last year's exodus to nature. 

Identifying the needs in Popular areas

Thanks to trip reports and talks with land managers, WTA recognized the increasing popularity of this area. So two years ago, we designated it as a focus area for our Trails Rebooted campaign, which is working towards creating sustainable trail systems and focusing on hiker education.

Hikers picking up trash on trail. Photo by Sandy Yee
One aspect of WTA's hiker education work is spreading the word about Leave No Trace practices, and motivating people to keep trails clean of trash. Photo by Sandy Yee.

On the Mountain Loop, we're working with the Forest Service and the Department of Natural Resources on a new approach to managing trails while meeting the needs of the people who visit.

But to do that well, we need to understand what people want when they head outside, and how their needs intersect with protecting and sustaining natural spaces. So late last year, WTA hosted a survey for hikers and other recreationists who live and play on trails along the highway. We wanted to know not just what was important to them, but what concerns they had about the area.

We're still parsing out survey data, but some major themes rose to the top: better parking options, cleaner trails and more toilets. Further detail about the themes will be available in the full report later this year, which will inform various agencies approach to managing this area in the future.

Hikers on Mount Dickerman. Photo by doristheexplorist.
Hikers want trails, and trails protect the surrounding landscape from impact. Photo by doristheexplorist.

What's on the table in 2021

Of course, while the survey results will help inform future management decisions, the Forest Service and DNR also needed to plan for the more immediate future — like what was going to happen in 2021.

Planning for trail projects usually starts a lot earlier than many people realize — WTA talks to agency partners about trail projects two and sometimes three years in advance. In 2020, despite the pandemic, the gears were already turning for this year's projects. Not to mention, the Forest Service received a windfall in the form of the passage of the Great American Outdoors Act (GAOA).

This historic Act provides millions in funding for Forest Service lands, and years of advocacy from hiking groups helped make it possible. If you've ever signed a letter of support for federal funding, pat yourself on the back right now — your voice helped fuel the projects that are happening on the loop this year!

In 2021, act will fund projects that restore access to popular places, like replacing the bridge that provides access to the Big Four Ice Caves. And the Forest Service is also looking at possibilities at Camp Silverton.

bridge at Big 4_doristheexplorist.jpeg
GAOA funding will help re-install a bridge that will restore access to the popular Big 4 Ice Caves. Photo by doristheexplorist.

Formerly a U.S. Forest Service ranger station and plant nursery, then later a camp for schoolchildren, this large open area has sat empty for years. It was closed in the early 2000s, and many of the remaining buildings were demolished in 2019, but  now, the Forest Service is exploring opportunities to incorporate the site into the overnight accommodations system that currently exists within the Verlot Corridor.

Improving trail systems statewide

Planning efforts for areas like this are underway in other parts of the state, too. In the Teanaway Community Forest, we're helping lay out a trail system that can keep up with the growing number of hikers. We're also exploring new ways to secure long-term funding on the Mountain Loop and in Snoquera, another focus area of our Trails Rebooted campaign.

Want to support our planning and education work in these areas? As a nonprofit, WTA relies on members to help make our work happen. You can make a donation today. We'll have more news about coming developments on the Mountain Loop this year. Stay tuned.

Comments

mountainscall on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

I'm excited to hear about the focus on the Mt Loop Highway. I don't see from the article that the forest roads will be getting any attention. The road to Mt Pilchuck is almost impassable without 4WD. So many avid hikers cannot afford 4WD vehicles, and would appreciate being able to access more trails. Is there any plan to address this? Thank you, WTA!

Posted by:


mountainscall on Mar 01, 2021 06:08 PM

Muledeer on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

Agree with mountainscall, the roads on the MLH are terrible, even for a high clearance car like a Subie. Many good family friendly trails are inaccessible with the family car. Example, Ashland Lakes.

Posted by:


Muledeer on Mar 01, 2021 09:52 PM

Washington Trails Association on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

Great point. Roads were definitely a concern for a lot of survey respondents. We hope we can incorporate road improvements in future planning, but since we're still sorting through all the responses, we don't have anything concrete yet!

Posted by:


Washington Trails Association on Mar 02, 2021 02:12 PM

Kevin.Loves.Hiking on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

I'd echo the road situation. Trailheads in this area also have a lot of crime issues with people breaking into vehicles. It would be great to see an expansion of the trail systems with some private enterprises involved in the funding. I wouldn't have any issues with paying for trail use. You could have a system where lower-income people are subsidized but I've often thought that a pay-for-use system along with some services like a hut system would easily be commercially viable. Most people who use the outdoors in the Seattle area are not in the lower-income brackets and I'd pay for a stay in firetower or remote cabin or series of hiker huts like you see in New Zealand. It would be easy to build a system that interseted with the Route 2 corridor, looped over to Lake Chelan and back to Steven's Pass. Design a system, not just a single trail.

Posted by:


Kevin.Loves.Hiking on Mar 02, 2021 03:20 PM

Arthur on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

We are already paying for trailhead parking passes. It was a “demonstration project” that was supposed to support trails. How much of that money is now actually being spent on trails?

Posted by:


Arthur on Mar 12, 2021 12:08 PM

Hikeswith3 on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

For me crime at the trail heads is the biggest deterrent to hiking here especially solo hiking.

Posted by:


Hikeswith3 on Mar 14, 2021 02:50 PM

JWD52 on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

The road issue is way beyond easier access on the FS roads. Many of these roads have section where if they fail/slide/washout now, there will be no quick low cost fix. Roads like Coal Lake, Mallardy ridge has many spots that are likely to fail, ending any access for the long term.
In other words, fix the worst spots BEFORE they fail, then worry about pot holes & grading

Posted by:


JWD52 on Mar 15, 2021 07:45 PM

MeLuckyTarns on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

Facilities? Where we're going, we don't need no "facilities!"

Posted by:


MeLuckyTarns on Mar 16, 2021 05:42 PM

M@sh on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

Is Meadow Mountain on the list to fix road access? Now requires 5 mile hike/bike to trailhead.

Posted by:


M@sh on Mar 17, 2021 04:57 PM

Richard Allen on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

I live in a off grid cabin in Silverton I moved after retiring up there to hike and camp backpack the rest of my life. I have hiked the mountain loop trails must of my life. there has been a huge increase in the use of the trails on the loop. lake 22 you have get there by 7:00 AM on a weekend to park in the lot I am very happy to see funds put into this area

Posted by:


Richard Allen on Mar 17, 2021 06:57 PM

Muledeer on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

I have to disagree with mash, I hope they never fix that road. I'm too old to ever hike up there, but considering the destruction we've seen from overuse at other places along the Loop and elsewhere, better to keep access a bit more difficult. Like Harvey Manning used to say, keeps the pikers out.

Posted by:


Muledeer on Mar 17, 2021 08:45 PM

BryBry on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

You nailed it JWD52!
Prioritize locating and preventing road bed failures before building new toilets and fixing potholes. Often the grading is part of preventing access-blocking failures, keeping the water in the ditches not eroding the driving surface, but I agree that grading for a smoother ride is less important than preventing major failures.

Posted by:


BryBry on Mar 18, 2021 11:30 AM

snowmonkey on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

Wow...so basically all the “affluent Seattle hikers” want to drive to a big, paved parking lot on a nice smooth road. Have a sparkling multi stalled bathroom and a security guard patrolling the lot. Why not turn the historic Verlot Ranger Station into a full blown souvenir shop with a cafe? Maybe a photo booth too. These areas have always been beautiful, wild and awe inspiring BECAUSE of many of the “flaws” listed. Once all these suggested changes are made and the area is over run then all the “Seattle hikers” will see some spectacular back country location on someone’s Instagram, find it, tell their friends to go and the process will start all over again. Perhaps pursue State run interpretive trails or Parks, they already have many of the amenities suggested.

Posted by:


snowmonkey on Mar 18, 2021 11:55 AM

mountainscall on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

snowmonkey -- LESS affluent hikers, those who can't afford 4WD vehicles, would like to have decent roads, potholes that don't bottom you out. Please see the original post. Thank you.

Posted by:


mountainscall on Mar 18, 2021 03:19 PM

Muledeer on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

snowmonkey- All mountainscall and I are saying, is that it would be nice to have some of the more family friendly, creaky knee friendly hikes more accessible for the type of car that families drive. We used to be able to get to lots of hikes in the old family wagon, not anymore. Case in point, Ashland Lakes. No one expects a paved road to Goat Flats or the old Kennedy Hot Springs site, and nobody expects or wants a bunch of paved interpretive trails or cafe at the ranger station, and most of us don't even want the MLH paved.

Posted by:


Muledeer on Mar 18, 2021 06:44 PM

MountainZipper on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

MOUNT PILCHUCK ROAD-LOOKING FOR INTERESTED POSITIVE SOLUTION MINDED HIKERS/CLIMBERS

Is there anyone who is interested in starting a GoFundMe page for the Mount Pilchuck Road repairs. Also is there anyone who would join the vision of meeting with Brian Hindman who is the US Forest Service Transportation Planner? I have written him by email, received a response from him, and just now doing follow up with him. We need more interested folks to join the cause, and quit bitching about the road and join with WTA, Citizens For Forest Roads (CFFR-on Facebook) and US Forest Service to get this horrible road damage repaired before they open the gate in May.

Lets get the writing and phone calls and meetup going. Are you for this?

brian.hindman@usda.gov
gretchen.v.smith@usda.gov

You may also reach out to me at: michaelr.63.12@gmail.com

Mon, Aug 17, 2020 at 12:51 PM Hindman, Brian J -FS <brian.hindman@usda.gov> wrote:
Michael,

Thank You for your concerns regarding FSR 42 Mt Pilchuck Road.

You are right that this is a road is one we have received many comments on in regards to its present condition. And has been assessed for maintenance needs and is a road of concern for the performance of maintenance.

In the assessment made the road is in such a condition that it would need more than just a grading and filling of pot holes. It would need brushing, drainage maintenance, grading and a significant amount of spot rock.

The brushing, drainage maintenance, grading and roller compaction cost depending on our contract bids are in the range of $10,000 to $25,000 for the 5 mile stretch of aggregate road. as for spot rock cost would vary greatly dependent on how much rock is added.

Cost could be less with less work being performed but comes with little gain and in my experience and does not hold up with the Traffic volume and speeds of the users.

As you are aware the USFS road budget is pretty much non-existent and has been on a decline for several years and at this point so little funds are available that the work we do, do, does not keep up with the demands of the use. So we have to make some very hard choices to address the road needs across the forest, a situation the very few people get what they want addressed.

Working with Snohomish County, The county has been a very supportive partner for the USFS and does perform road work on the USFS Portion of the Mountain Loop Hwy under an agreement with the Forest Service that has worked well. It is not an agreement that can be renegotiated at this time. For FSR 42 it may need to be a standalone agreement and does take a significant amount of time to negotiate, prepare and manage. To do that would take both the county and the USFS to agree to move in that direction.

As for a Volunteer Group, raising funds to perform the work is doable and has been pursued by other groups and we have had some great work accomplished by that method. Some work could be by hand and some could activities could be paid by an organization. It can be accomplished via a road Maintenance permit. For the work to be accomplished by and experienced road contractor utilizing USFS Specifications. Permit request and example permit attached.

If you have question please contact me and we could eventually meet in the field to discuss options.
Brian J Hindman
Forest Transportation Planner
Forest Service
Mt Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest
brian.hindman@usda.gov

Posted by:


MountainZipper on Mar 25, 2021 09:18 PM

mountainscall on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

MountainZipper, what great work you've done! I have never done a GoFundMe page, but I often write to my representatives, and would be happy to follow suit there. I'll also look at your FB page, and likely get in touch with you. Muledeer -- maybe you'd be interested too? I would definitely chip in for the cause.

Posted by:


mountainscall on Mar 25, 2021 09:33 PM

MountainZipper on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

Mountainscall! Thank you for your reply of encouragement. I just feel we've got to quite the the bitching and the waking up to aching bones and creaky struts on our vehicles after traveling to one of Washington's most beautiful hikes. Mount Pilchuck. I've climbed this mountain since about 1975 when I was 12 y.o. when the road was paved-and the lifts just recently shutdown for good.

I am ready to find a group of people who can join with like-mindedness to see this happen. Yet, we have to go through the proper channels-US Forest Service.

Hence, reaching out to these US Forest Service leaders is key. They want to help, I know. Brian Hindman had noted that he would even be willing to meet up with me in the field to discuss this...better yet, lets get a few positive minded action based climbers to join and put our thinkers together.

I have a call/voice message out to Gretchen Smith-as I only have her phone number at this time. I have been unable to locate a phone number for Brian H. Here is Gretchen's work cell # if you or anyone want to call her. (360)322-4190 She will likely have Brian's number.

I also have never done a GoFundMe page...but this seems like a viable way to gather the $10-25K needed.
This really is a small amount, knowing there is more than enough climbers who would be thrilled to pitch in financial help for this. Of course, the government can't cover this all-this is a rough time in our world and nation...forest service roads are not big on the list, I understand.

Feel free to reach me at my given email address: michaelr.63.12@gmail.com
I live in the Everett area
I would be glad to meet with others who want to do some constructive action to see Pilchuck Road fixed.


I recently came across this non-profit called Citizens For Forest Roads on Facebook: Here is an email I sent to them this week. Have not heard back from them:

Hello,

I am interested in knowing what CFFR might be doing in terms of
promoting repair work on the Mount Pilchuck Road-up to Heather
Lake TH and beyond to the Mount Pilchuck TH?

I have been in contact with the US Forest Service-Brian Hindman
Transportation Planner. I was referred to speak with him in
August of 2020 after first reaching out to the Snohomish County
Road Department.

I have recently reached out to Brian H. again after a break from
pursuing communications with him. I will continue reaching out
to him and others within the US Forest Service.

I would be interested in establishing connection with CFFR, to learn
of what is happening within the ranks of volunteers and change makers
for this purpose.

See letter exchange below with myself and Brian Hindman.

Can you give me an idea what CFFR is thinking of regarding
Mount Pilchuck road-hopefully there is action in process?

Please reply or feel free to contact me at XXX

Sincerely,


Michael R

Posted by:


MountainZipper on Mar 25, 2021 10:03 PM

Arthur on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

There is a volunteer group that is a 501c3 non-profit that already hadPs an agreement to work on some of the FS roads in the Darrington Ranger District. Their work is part of the reason we don’t have reduced access on the forest. They have a Facebook page Friends for Public Use. Or contact Martha mailto:martha@ffpu.org

Posted by:


Arthur on Mar 26, 2021 11:06 AM

MountainZipper on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

Arthur, Thank you for that lead! I will reach out to Martha. I had an awesome conversation with Roger N. of Citizens For Forest Roads (also a non-profit/see their Facebook). I received an incredible education on what they are doing, AND how all of us in the climbing community can be active. Roger is retired from the US Forest Service after 36 Years as a road engineer. He had so much information.
The biggest take away he gave was that we ALL need to petition by letter and call the Congress (mentioned DeBene as being very supportive). He is producing a letter that we all could send, or we could create our own...that is certainly from a political action position, I suppose.

I emphasize and my direction is that it is grass roots people as ourselves-climbers and hikers and lovers of this beautiful creation-perhaps should not wait for Congress and politicians and government to act---but that we raise the money, fill the permits/provide costs of liability matters(Roger said this last point was a stressor for CFFR), and we find a troop of volunteers/and paid road services approved by the Forest Service to do the work. Government dollars are too stressed for other reasons now, but perhaps as we find the Congress people who will back some of the recent Forest laws that happened recently. We can find funds from both sources: Public/Climbing Community and the Government.

I hope we can stay in contact. Please feel free to email me at the provided e-address, and pass the word around. Thank you.

Posted by:


MountainZipper on Mar 26, 2021 09:05 PM

IanPadron on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

I appear to be in the minority here in preferring that MLH access roads remain primitive and rough. 4x4 access only keeps the riff-raff out. The old trusty tweaker mobiles don't do very well on pothole riddled roads, and that is a good thing. The incidence rate of property crimes at trailheads in this state are astronomical, I like having a bit of peace of mind knowing that not every trailhead is readily accessed by a black toothed bandit in a Honda Civic.

Posted by:


IanPadron on Mar 28, 2021 07:08 PM

MountainZipper on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

Hey Ian, nothing wrong with some diversity of thought! Truth can always stand up to comparison and observing diverse opinion. I've heard it said that "Need is the breeding ground of service and changes".
Just as I and apparently a large portion of people would like to see Forest Road repairs (Mount Pilchuck Road please), so is there also a GREAT need for secure trailheads. Though your matter stated is a separate issue from the road repairs, you have made a good point of this need.

Are you saying you might be interested in forming a volunteer team of people who could monitor the trailheads and act as protectors of our vehicles? What a great idea!

I think this would be a great volunteer service!

Posted by:


MountainZipper on Mar 28, 2021 08:30 PM

MountainZipper on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

I appear to be in the minority here in preferring that MLH access roads remain primitive and rough. 4x4 access only keeps the riff-raff out. The old trusty tweaker mobiles don't do very well on pothole riddled roads, and that is a good thing. The incidence rate of property crimes at trailheads in this state are astronomical, I like having a bit of peace of mind knowing that not every trailhead is readily accessed by a black toothed bandit in a Honda Civic.

POSTED BY:
IanPadron on Mar 28, 2021 07:08 PM


Hey Ian, nothing wrong with some diversity of thought! Truth can always stand up to comparison and observing diverse opinions. I've heard it said that "Need is the breeding ground of service and changes".

Just as I and apparently a large portion of people would like to see Forest Road repairs (Mount Pilchuck Road please), so is there also a GREAT need for secure trailheads. Though your matter stated is a separate issue from the road repairs, you have made a good point of this need.

Are you saying you might be interested in forming a volunteer team of people who could monitor the trailheads and act as protectors of our vehicles? What a great idea!

I think this would be a great volunteer service!

MountainZipper 3/30/21

Posted by:


MountainZipper on Mar 30, 2021 11:19 PM

ricola on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

Its admirable that MountainZipper wants to set up a 'GoFundMe' page for the Pilchuck Rd. I'm usually all for such initiatives but for I find it incredible difficult to justify paying for basic infrastructure in the world's richest country with a 37% tax rate. We somehow have $22 billion (in addition to 10$bn for other cloud services) for Microsoft to develop military technology for the US Government (https://news.yahoo.com/microsoft-wins-pentagon-contract-augmented-203349070.html) but cannot cobble together 25k for road repairs, come on folks, wake up!

"As you are aware the USFS road budget is pretty much non-existent and has been on a decline for several years and at this point so little funds are available that the work we do ... " ... Unacceptable! It's the job of our elected officials and non-profits e.g. WTA (who are benefiting from 'tax exempt' status) who need to step up and resolve the infrastructure issue. Normalizing philanthropy as the 'defacto' for these projects will result in states/counties further defunding infrastructure projects as they become aware they can pass along the cost to hikers.

I would not recommend anyone fund infrastructure projects that should be paid for through tax dollars and user fees as is the current state.

Posted by:


ricola on Apr 03, 2021 04:57 PM

MountainZipper on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

Thank you, ricola, for your perspective around this matter. It definitely adds validity to the need that exists, and how the solution "should be" accomplished. We realize it would be wonderful for the taxes we pay to cover these repairs.

No matter our perspective, the work is not getting done. A lot of us who use the Pilchuck Road would like to see the repairs, and are unwilling to wait for "an act of Congress" to make it happen. If it's going to take an "act of Congress" to get it done, I'm figuring we will see the Pilchuck Road eventually disintegrate until only those with high clearance pickups will be able to make it to the trailhead. It's not far from that, and many people are compromising their vehicles to simply get out and recuperate from the isolation-difficulty of this pandemic. Not to mention, simply getting out and enjoying the refreshing beauty of the creation.

It's my opinion that if we want to continue to speak only of our ideas and keep it in the circular room of a blog, than we will continue to get what we are already getting-which is nothing.

There is certainly the option to write your Congressperson. I'm told DeBene is very supportive of this action of repairing the Forest Service Roads. Ricola, would you be willing to write and get others to write Congress? If we fill their inbox, mailbox and phone lines with many many reaching out...perhaps they will listen.

But for those of us who would like a sense of ownership in the project that leads to grassroots action that can bring quicker action-and the gift of shared responsibility and involvement-then those voices of action should be acting upon the idea of raising funds, attaining the necessary permits, and hiring a road repair/engineering firm to begin the work.

Ricola, would you be willing to join the mission of writing/reaching out to Congress impressing them for action?

The non-profit Citizens For Forest Roads(see Facebook page) is wanting mass amounts of people to contact by letter and other means our Congress to do what the recent laws changes have done to provide funding for the repair of Forest Roads. Please call them-speak with Roger.

For those of us who want to take immediate action, the idea of creating a team of people who know how to get action going-funding, permitting, covering liabilities, and obtaining a road repair/engineering provider...lets get together and make this happen.

Will you join this action based endeavor?

MichaelR-MountainZippper.

Posted by:


MountainZipper on Apr 03, 2021 09:42 PM

CBCB on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

There is a trade-off between accessibility and having a wilderness experience. I almost never hike trails close to Seattle because I'm trying to get into wilderness and be somewhat alone in nature whenever possible, not chuff up a mountain to prove my mettle with a thousand others. There is almost a 1-1 relationship between how hard or how long it takes to reach a trailhead and lowering the number of people who are there (aside from a few little known gems). I would suggest-Regrade roads on regular basis, especially popular hikes like Pilchuck and Boulder River (another disaster road), so people can access. Repair and restore already established trails, bridges, etc. Pave NOTHING more (especially Mountain Loop Highway!) and no further development please!

Posted by:


CBCB on Apr 10, 2021 11:18 AM

MountainZipper on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

CBCB-Thank you. Very well thought out. The 1:1 ratio, I like to call "Butt to Back" ratio. How much butt time(sitting)till I get my "back"-pack on (Trail Head). Butt:Back. Are you interested in participating in clean up, or other support to get the road to Pilchuck and Boulder River back to decency? Please connect with me if you would like to help or know others who would. I am the primary adopting person for the Mount Pilchuck Road through Friends For Public Use (FFPU-has Facebook Page). You welcome to come join-in person, with financial help to get the road repairs, or community awareness. Thanks for your thoughts. MountainZipper

Posted by:


MountainZipper on Apr 10, 2021 10:21 PM

Seattle_Wayne on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

For those of you who want their special hiking area to remain special because not a lot of hikers hike it, paving Pilchuck Rd would be an absolute benefit to you. Lake 22 and Heather Lake take the brunt of the hikers that can not make the road up to Pilchuck.

I'd like to see the washout on the road leading up to Three Fingers TH repaired. It's probably going to need a bridge like Big Four but for vehicles. Who knows what that'll cost but because Three Fingers isn't overly popular, it doesn't get a lot of attention or demand for repair. Three Fingers is obviously an overnight hike now because of the impassable road.

Posted by:


Seattle_Wayne on Apr 20, 2021 09:07 AM

MountainZipper on Meeting The Need: Investments on the Mountain Loop Highway

Seattle Wayne, thank you. Good thoughts about the Pilchuck Road and the needs on the Three Fingers Road...Friends for Public Use (FPPU on Facebook) has an team who are working on that road and working in conjunction with the Forest Service to get that road fixed...but yes, it will be complicated. Private individuals who have the financial capability can help FPPU and the Forest Service will receive funding's and volunteer help to see these roads repaired. Are you aware and interested in being of service to these roads-help is always welcome?

Posted by:


MountainZipper on Apr 27, 2021 10:02 PM