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Hikers Respond to Sauk Mountain Shooting

Posted by Cascade Liberation Organization at Aug 06, 2008 03:10 PM |

Hikers continue to respond to the tragic accidental shooting of hiker Pamela Almli on the Sauk Mountain Trail last weekend. My post two days ago has generated a very thoughtful discussion of hunting, hiking and safety on trails. I've also received quite a few e-mails from our members and hikers about the tragedy. I encourage hikers to continue posting their thoughts to the blog or to e-mail me.

The general tenor of these comments has been sadness and shock. Shock, generally, that someone hiking a very busy trail on Forest Service land could have her life taken away from her so suddenly. Many hikers I've heard from (and some who are hunters) are questioning whether it's a good idea to allow hunters as young as 12 to hunt unaccompanied by an adult (as Washington state law currently allows). Certainly, legislation alone won't prevent a similar incident from happening, but it sounds reasonable to me to require hunters under a certain age to have a responsible, trained adult hunter with them. If you support changing existing state law on this, I would urge you to contact your state legislators.

The other question I've heard raised is whether it's appropriate to allow hunting on such a busy trail. I don't know the answer to this, but it does seem unwise to allow hunting on very heavily used trails. There are hunting restrictions on trails such as Mount Si and Tiger Mountain [*] --and it probably makes sense to selectively restrict hunting on some high-use trails on National Forest lands (Lake 22, Barclay Lake, Snow Lake and other I-90 corridor trails, and Rachel Lake are just a few that come to mind). [* EDITORIAL UPDATE: An official from DNR told me late this afternoon that while it is not legal to hunt on trails on Mount  Si, it is in fact legal to hunt on Mount Si (!) as long as you step off the trail.]

In today's Seattle Times, Snohomish County sheriff's deputy Greg Rasar says that

"it was just a matter of time until somebody was accidentally shot." He noted, according to the article, that the state lacks "simple and plain" guidelines and regulations that apply to national forests and could make the trails and woods safer for all.

I do want to emphasize that hiking is a very safe activity, assuming that you plan ahead and take precautions such as always packing the ten essentials. According to Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, this accident is the only bystander fatality hunting accident in the state of Washington in at least 25 years, probably more. We shouldn't let this sad and tragic incident keep us from hiking the trails. I plan to hike this weekend with my kids.

For those who want to avoid trails where hunting is allowed (and remember that right now, it's only bear and cougar season, with a relatively few number of hunters out there) I would recommend trails in either National Parks or Washington State Parks, where hunting is prohibited. To learn more about the dates of hunting seasons, you can see this comprehensive list from WDFW. As you can see, though, it's complicated, and I'd say nearly impossible for a hiker who doesn't know much about hunting to sort it all out. I suppose it's best to assume hunters are out on a trail unless you know otherwise, and to wear bright clothing, to make a little noise on the trail, and let hunters know you're in the vicinity if you encounter them.

Comments

Hikers & Hunters have a lot in common

It is important to avoid divisiveness between hikers and hunters. Hikers must remember our common interests, and that the conservation movement started largely with hunters and fishermen, who were the first to notice that the animals and habitat were disappearing.

I no longer hunt or fish, but I've never forgotten that first day my dad took me hunting at age 8, and I've been outdoors every chance I can get for the 48 years since.

Posted by:


Cascade Liberation Organization on Aug 13, 2008 10:39 AM

Hikers & Hunters have a lot in common

I agree that most hunters and hikers have much in common; we all (all outdoors people) need to think about how we can safely enjoy our sports while leaving room and respecting the sports of others.

I have hiked in the Cascades and Washington National Parks for over 38 years with out incident. I have also avoided trails during hunting season or not hiked when hunting parties were in an area. A rifle shot can travel long distances.

I feel compassion for the young man who made the error. It would seem some sort of community service might be in order and help him. I also think have young people out on un-supervised hunts is a bad idea. I know I was a bit frightened when our daughter was out on her own driving, teenagers (us old folks too) need help to develop and improve judgment skills. Whether driving or working with a loaded rifle, adult (read here adult/experienced family) supervision should be there to help prevent accidents.

No Hunter I am aware of wants to hurt another human, my suggestion is to have an open forum on how best to deal with young hunters, hunters and hiking trails, and keeping wild areas open and safe for everyone.

Posted by:


Alpine Art on Aug 13, 2008 03:57 PM

A few responses to comments made in your article

"and it probably makes sense to selectively restrict hunting on some high-use trails on National Forest lands (Lake 22, Barclay Lake, Snow Lake and other I-90 corridor trails, and Rachel Lake are just a few that come to mind)."

You stressed this is the first accidental bystander fatality in 25 years, at the least. If you feel it necessary to make existing hunting regulations even more restrictive, perhaps a study should be done on how many hiking related fatalities occurred on these popular trails. If a single death occurred, maybe hiking should be forbidden in these areas as well.

  "Snohomish County sheriff's deputy Greg Rasar says that

"it was just a matter of time until somebody was accidentally shot." He noted, according to the article, that the state lacks "simple and plain" guidelines and regulations that apply to national forests and could make the trails and woods safer for all."

This quote is completely nonsensical considering we are talking about one accidental death in 25 YEARS. That would be like me saying, "it was a matter of time before someone was killed walking across the street" "it was a matter of time before someone drowned while swimming the ocean" "it was a matter of time before a police officer shot and killed an innocent teenager."

This was a tragedy. The kid shouldn't have taken the shot. One tragedy is no reason to change the laws for everyone. If that was to be the case, then you better get busy outlawing alcohol and tobacco because those cause 1000X more deaths.

Posted by:


bowhuntergirl on Apr 27, 2009 01:50 PM